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TITLE
Tossing the Caber
EXTERNAL ID
PC_BOBDOBSON_002
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1900s
CREATOR
Sir Benjamin Stone
SOURCE
Bob Dobson
ASSET ID
21972
KEYWORDS
Highland Games
cabers
tossing
throwing
heavy events
competitions
Tossing the Caber

This photographs shows a man taking part in a Caber Tossing contest at a Highland Games.

The dimensions of a caber can vary enormously but a typical one weighs about 68kgs, is 5.5m long and about 23cms thick at one end, tapering to about 13cms at the other. The caber is not thrown for distance but for style. The object is to throw the pole directly ahead, landing on the heavy end so that the light end makes a perfect turn over and lands pointing directly in line, away from the thrower. Points are then awarded on how straight the caber falls with any deviation attracting penalty points.

This photograph was taken by Sir Benjamin Stone in the early 1900s.

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Tossing the Caber

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1900s

Highland Games; cabers; tossing; throwing; heavy events; competitions;

Bob Dobson

This photographs shows a man taking part in a Caber Tossing contest at a Highland Games.<br /> <br /> The dimensions of a caber can vary enormously but a typical one weighs about 68kgs, is 5.5m long and about 23cms thick at one end, tapering to about 13cms at the other. The caber is not thrown for distance but for style. The object is to throw the pole directly ahead, landing on the heavy end so that the light end makes a perfect turn over and lands pointing directly in line, away from the thrower. Points are then awarded on how straight the caber falls with any deviation attracting penalty points.<br /> <br /> This photograph was taken by Sir Benjamin Stone in the early 1900s.