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TITLE
Throwing the Hammer
EXTERNAL ID
PC_BOBDOBSON_003
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1900s
CREATOR
Sir Benjamin Stone
SOURCE
Bob Dobson
ASSET ID
21973
KEYWORDS
hammers
competitions
Highland Games
heavy events
Throwing the Hammer

Competitions for hammer throwing have been a popular pastime around blacksmiths, farms, quarries and any other place of work where hammers were used. Originally the hammers used were wooden-shafted sledgehammers but as competitions became more regulated these have been replaced by an iron sphere attached to a bamboo or cane shaft. (This design is used for hammers in Highland Games events and is different to hammers used for athletic events such as the Olympics) The hammer measures 4ft 2inches and weighs either 16lbs or 22lbs.

The most common way of throwing the hammer has the contestant standing with his back to the direction of the throw. He will then swing the hammer around his head for momentum and then release it over his shoulder. Technique is as important as strength in this competition.

This photograph was taken by Sir Benjamin Stone at the Inverness Gathering in the early 1900s.

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Throwing the Hammer

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1900s

hammers; competitions; Highland Games; heavy events;

Bob Dobson

Competitions for hammer throwing have been a popular pastime around blacksmiths, farms, quarries and any other place of work where hammers were used. Originally the hammers used were wooden-shafted sledgehammers but as competitions became more regulated these have been replaced by an iron sphere attached to a bamboo or cane shaft. (This design is used for hammers in Highland Games events and is different to hammers used for athletic events such as the Olympics) The hammer measures 4ft 2inches and weighs either 16lbs or 22lbs.<br /> <br /> The most common way of throwing the hammer has the contestant standing with his back to the direction of the throw. He will then swing the hammer around his head for momentum and then release it over his shoulder. Technique is as important as strength in this competition.<br /> <br /> This photograph was taken by Sir Benjamin Stone at the Inverness Gathering in the early 1900s.