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TITLE
Dùn Carloway, Isle of Lewis
EXTERNAL ID
PC_BRANLEY_BROCH_3
PLACENAME
Carloway
DISTRICT
Lewis
DATE OF IMAGE
11 February 2010
PERIOD
2010s
CREATOR
Stephen Branley
SOURCE
Stephen Branley
ASSET ID
21976
KEYWORDS
brochs
buildings
dwellings
ruins
archaeological remains
Dùn Carloway, Isle of Lewis

Dùn Carloway is a Broch (Round Tower), Dùn is the Gaelic word meaning 'Fort,' and is situated near Carloway on the Isle of Lewis.

Brochs are amongst Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings. These stone roundhouses were built between 300BC and 200AD and are found mainly in the north and west of Scotland. Brochs were probably built to reflect the prestige and status of their inhabitants and were primarily dwelling places for the principle family in the area. They certainly would have provided protection from sporadic raiders, but were not purely defensive structures. The double-skinned dry stone walls (inset) support each other and make it possible to build a relatively lightweight, high structure. The roofing and interiors of Brochs are subject to much debate.

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Dùn Carloway, Isle of Lewis

2010s

brochs; buildings; dwellings; ruins; archaeological remains

Stephen Branley

Isle of Lewis photographs by Stephen Branley

Dùn Carloway is a Broch (Round Tower), Dùn is the Gaelic word meaning 'Fort,' and is situated near Carloway on the Isle of Lewis. <br /> <br /> Brochs are amongst Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings. These stone roundhouses were built between 300BC and 200AD and are found mainly in the north and west of Scotland. Brochs were probably built to reflect the prestige and status of their inhabitants and were primarily dwelling places for the principle family in the area. They certainly would have provided protection from sporadic raiders, but were not purely defensive structures. The double-skinned dry stone walls (inset) support each other and make it possible to build a relatively lightweight, high structure. The roofing and interiors of Brochs are subject to much debate.