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TITLE
Calanais Stones, Isle of Lewis
EXTERNAL ID
PC_BRANLEY_CALANAIS_1
PLACENAME
Callanish
DISTRICT
Lewis
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Uig
DATE OF IMAGE
24 May 2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Stephen Branley
SOURCE
Stephen Branley
ASSET ID
21977
KEYWORDS
stones
standing stones
monuments
archaeological remains
Calanais Stones, Isle of Lewis

The stones are between 3000 and 4000 years old and are coarse-grained pink granite, Lewisian Gneiss. There are many sites in the Calanais area but this is the most famous with a complex arrangement of about 50 stones. At the heart is a circle of 13 stones between 2.5 and 4 metres tall which surrounds the tallest stone on the site which is nearly 5 metres high and weighs about 5.5 tonnes.

There has been a theory, one of many, that the stones form a calendar system based on the moon's position. When looking south, some have suggested that the alignment of the stone avenue pointed to the setting of midsummer full moon behind a distant mountain called the Clisham. Critics of these theories argue that several alignments are likely to exist purely by chance in any such structure.

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Calanais Stones, Isle of Lewis

ROSS: Uig

2000s

stones; standing stones; monuments; archaeological remains

Stephen Branley

Isle of Lewis photographs by Stephen Branley

The stones are between 3000 and 4000 years old and are coarse-grained pink granite, Lewisian Gneiss. There are many sites in the Calanais area but this is the most famous with a complex arrangement of about 50 stones. At the heart is a circle of 13 stones between 2.5 and 4 metres tall which surrounds the tallest stone on the site which is nearly 5 metres high and weighs about 5.5 tonnes. <br /> <br /> There has been a theory, one of many, that the stones form a calendar system based on the moon's position. When looking south, some have suggested that the alignment of the stone avenue pointed to the setting of midsummer full moon behind a distant mountain called the Clisham. Critics of these theories argue that several alignments are likely to exist purely by chance in any such structure.