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TITLE
Tigh Scoraig
EXTERNAL ID
PC_BUSH_019
PLACENAME
Scoraig
DISTRICT
Lochbroom
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochbroom
DATE OF IMAGE
2012
PERIOD
2010s
SOURCE
Alan Bush
ASSET ID
22020
KEYWORDS
Scorraig
gardens
trees
Tigh Scoraig

This photograph shows Tigh Scoraig, a croft house on the Scoraig peninsula. It is interesting to compare it to another photograph of the same house (PC_BUSH_018) which was taken in the 1960s when the area surrounding the house was treeless.

The large tree on the extreme right of the photograph is a Corsican Pine, a species not normally associated with the north of Scotland (native to the Mediterranean, they were first introduced into Britain in the 1750s) although it is not noted for being resistant to wind and salt.

Also, the warm water of the Gulf Stream, along with similar warm air currents, has quite a dramatic effect on the climate of the coastal area of the west Highlands and allows certain plants and other vegetation to flourish in places they normally would not. This is why, for example, palm trees are able to grow at Plockton.

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Tigh Scoraig

ROSS: Lochbroom

2010s

Scorraig; gardens; trees

Alan Bush

Alun Bush - Scoraig & Nigg

This photograph shows Tigh Scoraig, a croft house on the Scoraig peninsula. It is interesting to compare it to another photograph of the same house (PC_BUSH_018) which was taken in the 1960s when the area surrounding the house was treeless.<br /> <br /> The large tree on the extreme right of the photograph is a Corsican Pine, a species not normally associated with the north of Scotland (native to the Mediterranean, they were first introduced into Britain in the 1750s) although it is not noted for being resistant to wind and salt.<br /> <br /> Also, the warm water of the Gulf Stream, along with similar warm air currents, has quite a dramatic effect on the climate of the coastal area of the west Highlands and allows certain plants and other vegetation to flourish in places they normally would not. This is why, for example, palm trees are able to grow at Plockton.