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TITLE
The Doctors' Cars, Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_REVHENDERSON_22
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Reverend Derek Henderson
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2203
KEYWORDS
slide shows
photographer
photographers
doctors
automobiles
audio

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Joseph Cook was a popular Inverness speaker who collected photographs on many subjects to illustrate his talks. In this audio extract, taken from a recorded slide show, the Reverend Derek Henderson of Inverness discusses one of Mr. Cook's images.

'The first car in Inverness belonged to Dr. England Kerr. Now, you may say 'Ah-hah, he's made a mistake, it's ST9.' But I haven't made a mistake; this was indeed the first car in Inverness. It was before licensing plates were necessary. And by the time Dr. England Kerr got round to the licensing plates he was up to ST9. There are three of them down at Smith Island, where the rubbish dump is today, it was a golf course in my young day, and the doctors are Dr. Nicholson, Dr. Brown and Dr. Kerr.

My father was an engineer; he didn't know anything about internal combustion engines, he knew about steam, and for some reason or other, Dr. Kerr asked him to come along and do something for his car, which wasn't going too well - that's at the top of, the end of Culduthel Road and Old Edinburgh Road - that's where he lived. Well, my father went up and by the greatest fluke on earth he got the car to go. And he thought well, to use an old Inverness word, 'Since I've gone this far, I'll have a shotty.' So he had a shotty, but the trouble was he couldn't stop it. And this car here went right down Castle Street, the Haugh Brae, right down Castle Street, right down Academy Street, turned right at Academy Street, went down High Street, went down Inglis Street, Academy Street, and right down to the shore, where Hendersons had their engineering works. And my Auntie Jessie had a drying green there and that car went round and round and round till it ran out of petrol'

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The Doctors' Cars, Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1980s

slide shows; photographer; photographers; doctors; automobiles; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Rev. Henderson on Joseph Cook

Joseph Cook was a popular Inverness speaker who collected photographs on many subjects to illustrate his talks. In this audio extract, taken from a recorded slide show, the Reverend Derek Henderson of Inverness discusses one of Mr. Cook's images.<br /> <br /> 'The first car in Inverness belonged to Dr. England Kerr. Now, you may say 'Ah-hah, he's made a mistake, it's ST9.' But I haven't made a mistake; this was indeed the first car in Inverness. It was before licensing plates were necessary. And by the time Dr. England Kerr got round to the licensing plates he was up to ST9. There are three of them down at Smith Island, where the rubbish dump is today, it was a golf course in my young day, and the doctors are Dr. Nicholson, Dr. Brown and Dr. Kerr. <br /> <br /> My father was an engineer; he didn't know anything about internal combustion engines, he knew about steam, and for some reason or other, Dr. Kerr asked him to come along and do something for his car, which wasn't going too well - that's at the top of, the end of Culduthel Road and Old Edinburgh Road - that's where he lived. Well, my father went up and by the greatest fluke on earth he got the car to go. And he thought well, to use an old Inverness word, 'Since I've gone this far, I'll have a shotty.' So he had a shotty, but the trouble was he couldn't stop it. And this car here went right down Castle Street, the Haugh Brae, right down Castle Street, right down Academy Street, turned right at Academy Street, went down High Street, went down Inglis Street, Academy Street, and right down to the shore, where Hendersons had their engineering works. And my Auntie Jessie had a drying green there and that car went round and round and round till it ran out of petrol'