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TITLE
Preparing mussels for bait.
EXTERNAL ID
PC_CAMPBELLROSS_09
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
DATE OF IMAGE
c.1910
PERIOD
1910s
CREATOR
Willie John Smith
SOURCE
Campbell Ross
ASSET ID
22042
KEYWORDS
fishing communities
Preparing mussels for bait.

A fisher man, possibly John 'Smith' Skinner, and his wife sit preparing mussels for bait outside their house at Cromarty. The man is wearing a peaked cap and a sleeved, double-breasted waistcoat. The sleeves would be of blue serge and the body of kersey. His wife is wearing an apron and shawl. In front of them is a quarter-cran herring basket and, to the right, a scoo (creel) and line.

There was a fishing community at Cromarty at least as far back as the seventeenth century and possibly even earlier than that. The people were distinct from the rest of the town and had their own customs and dialect.

Fishing boats tended to be small and the men were able to fish close to home. The women prepared the bait and fixed it to the lines and hooks. They even carried the men out to the boats, so they would start the day with dry feet, and brought back the catch in baskets from the boats to the shore.

This is from of a series of photographs of Cromarty and its fishertown taken c.1910 by William John Smith. Smith was a resident of Cromarty and therefore familiar with his subjects. This made the pictures seem less stilted than many others of the same period.

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Preparing mussels for bait.

ROSS: Cromarty

1910s

fishing communities

Campbell Ross

Willie John Smith Archive

A fisher man, possibly John 'Smith' Skinner, and his wife sit preparing mussels for bait outside their house at Cromarty. The man is wearing a peaked cap and a sleeved, double-breasted waistcoat. The sleeves would be of blue serge and the body of kersey. His wife is wearing an apron and shawl. In front of them is a quarter-cran herring basket and, to the right, a scoo (creel) and line.<br /> <br /> There was a fishing community at Cromarty at least as far back as the seventeenth century and possibly even earlier than that. The people were distinct from the rest of the town and had their own customs and dialect.<br /> <br /> Fishing boats tended to be small and the men were able to fish close to home. The women prepared the bait and fixed it to the lines and hooks. They even carried the men out to the boats, so they would start the day with dry feet, and brought back the catch in baskets from the boats to the shore.<br /> <br /> This is from of a series of photographs of Cromarty and its fishertown taken c.1910 by William John Smith. Smith was a resident of Cromarty and therefore familiar with his subjects. This made the pictures seem less stilted than many others of the same period.