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TITLE
The skills of a bone-setter (2 of 2)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_SARAHMORRISON_02
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
Sarah Morrison
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2213
KEYWORDS
showmen
carnivals
circuses
funfairs
puppets
puppet shows
fairgrounds
healers
bone setters
audio

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Sarah Morrison and her husband, Duncan, used to put on Punch and Judy shows in various parts of the Highlands, including Ullapool, Dornoch and Lochinver. Duncan came from a family of travelling entertainers; his grandfather, John Morrison, had joined Pindar's Circus when it was on tour in Sutherland while his father, William Duncan Morrison, put on Punch and Judy shows in and around Inverness.

In this audio extract from the late 1970s, Sarah Morrison talks to Graeme Farnell about her husband's bone-setting skills.

Interviewer: What did he actually used to do to people? How did he do it? Did you ever see him actually working on people? Was it - ?

Oh yes, aye, I have helped him. If the shoulder was out, for instance, I had to get them there, and, and he pulled the arm then. I'd you down like that, you couldn't come up, and he would - And, of course, the jerk, you would say, 'Aaaah!' He'd say, 'It's all right now. Just calm. That's it over.' I could hear it going in. Same with an ankle. Shinty players, from Muir of Ord, were regular customers and they were always getting knocked out.

Interviewer: Gracious. And was this, was this something that he, he did without any charge for people or, did he used to make a small charge ?

No, he didn't make a charge.

Interviewer: No.

I can tell you a story about that. It was up to the goodness of the people if they gave him something an that but there was one person from the far north - Oh, I don't know, his big toe had been out for twenty years or something - my father in law was living at the time. He'd been there several times an each time when he went away he said, 'I'll send ye down a bag o potatoes an a bag of turnips' an all this, that, an the next thing. I think my father in law would rather he went out an said nothing. This day he said to him, 'Dinna worry about that, laddie, if you just give me the price o the bandage.' Because bandages, an olive oil, an wintergreen, an all - though it was very much cheaper then in those days, an that sort of thing, but no he never ever made a charge.

Interviewer: And Duncan just picked it up from seeing his father working, yes?

Seeing his father do it, yes

Image Copyright - Alexander Lamont Henderson. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.

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The skills of a bone-setter (2 of 2)

1970s

showmen; carnivals; circuses; funfairs; puppets; puppet shows; fairgrounds; healers; bone setters; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Travelling Entertainers

Sarah Morrison and her husband, Duncan, used to put on Punch and Judy shows in various parts of the Highlands, including Ullapool, Dornoch and Lochinver. Duncan came from a family of travelling entertainers; his grandfather, John Morrison, had joined Pindar's Circus when it was on tour in Sutherland while his father, William Duncan Morrison, put on Punch and Judy shows in and around Inverness.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the late 1970s, Sarah Morrison talks to Graeme Farnell about her husband's bone-setting skills.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What did he actually used to do to people? How did he do it? Did you ever see him actually working on people? Was it - ?<br /> <br /> Oh yes, aye, I have helped him. If the shoulder was out, for instance, I had to get them there, and, and he pulled the arm then. I'd you down like that, you couldn't come up, and he would - And, of course, the jerk, you would say, 'Aaaah!' He'd say, 'It's all right now. Just calm. That's it over.' I could hear it going in. Same with an ankle. Shinty players, from Muir of Ord, were regular customers and they were always getting knocked out.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Gracious. And was this, was this something that he, he did without any charge for people or, did he used to make a small charge ?<br /> <br /> No, he didn't make a charge. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: No.<br /> <br /> I can tell you a story about that. It was up to the goodness of the people if they gave him something an that but there was one person from the far north - Oh, I don't know, his big toe had been out for twenty years or something - my father in law was living at the time. He'd been there several times an each time when he went away he said, 'I'll send ye down a bag o potatoes an a bag of turnips' an all this, that, an the next thing. I think my father in law would rather he went out an said nothing. This day he said to him, 'Dinna worry about that, laddie, if you just give me the price o the bandage.' Because bandages, an olive oil, an wintergreen, an all - though it was very much cheaper then in those days, an that sort of thing, but no he never ever made a charge.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And Duncan just picked it up from seeing his father working, yes?<br /> <br /> Seeing his father do it, yes<br /> <br /> Image Copyright - Alexander Lamont Henderson. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.