Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Andrew de Moray Plaque, Avoch
EXTERNAL ID
PC_DONALD_AVOCHPLAQUE
PLACENAME
Avoch
DISTRICT
Avoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Avoch
DATE OF IMAGE
2002
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Janine Donald
SOURCE
Janine Donald
ASSET ID
22315
KEYWORDS
castles
Andrew de Moray Plaque, Avoch

This plaque commemorates the 'North Rising' and raising of the standard by Andrew de Moray at Ormond Hill, Avoch.

Andrew de Moray was a key player during the Scottish Wars of Independence against England in the late 13th century. His Anglo-Norman family held the Castle of Avoch, or Ormond Castle, at Avoch on the Black Isle. After the Scots were defeated at the Battle of Dunbar in 1296, de Moray was taken prisoner but he escaped the following year and raised his standard at Avoch to rally his troops. His army marched south to join forces with William Wallace and the combined Scottish forces defeated the English at the Battle of Stirling Bridge. Sadly, Andrew was mortally wounded at the battle and died of his injuries shortly afterwards. Before his death, however, he wrote, with Wallace, a letter to the merchants of Lübeck and Hamburg inviting them to re-open Scottish trade routes. This letter, issued from Haddington on 11 October 1297, still exists and has been returned to Scotland from Lübeck on more than one occasion for temporary display in exhibitions

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Andrew de Moray Plaque, Avoch

ROSS: Avoch

2000s

castles

Janine Donald

This plaque commemorates the 'North Rising' and raising of the standard by Andrew de Moray at Ormond Hill, Avoch.<br /> <br /> Andrew de Moray was a key player during the Scottish Wars of Independence against England in the late 13th century. His Anglo-Norman family held the Castle of Avoch, or Ormond Castle, at Avoch on the Black Isle. After the Scots were defeated at the Battle of Dunbar in 1296, de Moray was taken prisoner but he escaped the following year and raised his standard at Avoch to rally his troops. His army marched south to join forces with William Wallace and the combined Scottish forces defeated the English at the Battle of Stirling Bridge. Sadly, Andrew was mortally wounded at the battle and died of his injuries shortly afterwards. Before his death, however, he wrote, with Wallace, a letter to the merchants of Lübeck and Hamburg inviting them to re-open Scottish trade routes. This letter, issued from Haddington on 11 October 1297, still exists and has been returned to Scotland from Lübeck on more than one occasion for temporary display in exhibitions