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TITLE
Plaque at Caledonian Canal, Clachnaharry
EXTERNAL ID
PC_DONALD_CLACHNAHARRYPLAQUE
PLACENAME
Clachnaharry
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
2002
PERIOD
1820s
CREATOR
Janine Donald
SOURCE
Janine Donald
ASSET ID
22333
KEYWORDS
plaques
canals
poems
poetry
monuments
Plaque at Caledonian Canal, Clachnaharry

The English Poet Laureate, Robert Southey (1774-1843), was a friend of the civil engineer Thomas Telford. In 1819 he accompanied Telford on a tour of his engineering projects in the Highlands of Scotland, including the Caledonian Canal which was still under construction at that time. A diary of his observations was published posthumously in 1929 as 'Journal of a tour in Scotland in 1819'

Southey wrote three poetical inscriptions for commemorative plaques to be erected on the canal at Clachnaharry, Fort Augustus and Banavie. This is the plaque at Clachnaharry at the side of the main A862 road through the village. It was erected in 1822. The poem reads,

'Where these capacious basins by the laws
Of the subjacent element, receive
The Ship, descending or upraised, eight times,
From stage to stage with unfelt agency
Translated, fitliest may the marble here
Record the Architect's immortal name.
TELFORD it was, by whose presiding mind
The whole great work was plann'd and perfected;
TELFORD, who o'er the vale of Cambrian Dee
Aloft in air at giddy height upborne
Carried his Navigable road; and hung
High o'er Menai's Strait the bending Bridge:
Structures of more ambitious enterprize
Than Minstrels in the age of old Romance
To their own Merlin's magic lore ascribed.
Nor hath he for his native land performed
Less in this proud design; and where his Piers
Around her coast from from many a Fisher's Creek
Unsheltered else, and many an ample Port
Repel the assailing storm; and where his Roads
In beautiful and sinuous line far seen,
Wind with the vale, and win the long ascent,
Now o'er the deep morass sustained, and now
Across ravine, or glen, or estuary,
Opening a passage through the wilds subdued'

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Plaque at Caledonian Canal, Clachnaharry

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1820s

plaques; canals; poems; poetry; monuments

Janine Donald

The English Poet Laureate, Robert Southey (1774-1843), was a friend of the civil engineer Thomas Telford. In 1819 he accompanied Telford on a tour of his engineering projects in the Highlands of Scotland, including the Caledonian Canal which was still under construction at that time. A diary of his observations was published posthumously in 1929 as 'Journal of a tour in Scotland in 1819'<br /> <br /> Southey wrote three poetical inscriptions for commemorative plaques to be erected on the canal at Clachnaharry, Fort Augustus and Banavie. This is the plaque at Clachnaharry at the side of the main A862 road through the village. It was erected in 1822. The poem reads,<br /> <br /> 'Where these capacious basins by the laws <br /> Of the subjacent element, receive <br /> The Ship, descending or upraised, eight times,<br /> From stage to stage with unfelt agency <br /> Translated, fitliest may the marble here<br /> Record the Architect's immortal name.<br /> TELFORD it was, by whose presiding mind<br /> The whole great work was plann'd and perfected;<br /> TELFORD, who o'er the vale of Cambrian Dee<br /> Aloft in air at giddy height upborne<br /> Carried his Navigable road; and hung <br /> High o'er Menai's Strait the bending Bridge: <br /> Structures of more ambitious enterprize<br /> Than Minstrels in the age of old Romance<br /> To their own Merlin's magic lore ascribed.<br /> Nor hath he for his native land performed<br /> Less in this proud design; and where his Piers <br /> Around her coast from from many a Fisher's Creek<br /> Unsheltered else, and many an ample Port <br /> Repel the assailing storm; and where his Roads<br /> In beautiful and sinuous line far seen,<br /> Wind with the vale, and win the long ascent,<br /> Now o'er the deep morass sustained, and now<br /> Across ravine, or glen, or estuary,<br /> Opening a passage through the wilds subdued'