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TITLE
Entrance to burial cairn, Clava
EXTERNAL ID
PC_DONALD_CLAVA03
PLACENAME
Clava
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Croy and Dalcross
DATE OF IMAGE
2002
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Janine Donald
SOURCE
Janine Donald
ASSET ID
22336
KEYWORDS
chambered cairns
passage graves
Clava cairns
Entrance to burial cairn, Clava

This photograph shows the entrance to the northeast passage cairn at Clava, near Inverness.

The site at Balnuaran of Clava comprises of two chambered cairns and a ring cairn, each surrounded by a stone circle. The site has given its name to two varieties of cairns found in and around the Inverness area (ring cairn and passage grave). It was originally thought that the site dates from the late-Neolithic but recent excavation work suggests they may be later, from the Bronze Age.

The passageways of the two burial cairns or passage-graves are aligned to the midwinter solstice, the day with the shortest period of daylight in the year. The kerb stones and the standing stones are also graded in size, becoming larger towards the southwest and the midwinter sunset. Excavations in 1828, 1857 and the 1950s revealed pieces of pottery and flint and cremated human bones. The site was obviously of great significance and was possibly reserved for people of high status

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Entrance to burial cairn, Clava

INVERNESS: Croy and Dalcross

2000s

chambered cairns; passage graves; Clava cairns

Janine Donald

This photograph shows the entrance to the northeast passage cairn at Clava, near Inverness.<br /> <br /> The site at Balnuaran of Clava comprises of two chambered cairns and a ring cairn, each surrounded by a stone circle. The site has given its name to two varieties of cairns found in and around the Inverness area (ring cairn and passage grave). It was originally thought that the site dates from the late-Neolithic but recent excavation work suggests they may be later, from the Bronze Age. <br /> <br /> The passageways of the two burial cairns or passage-graves are aligned to the midwinter solstice, the day with the shortest period of daylight in the year. The kerb stones and the standing stones are also graded in size, becoming larger towards the southwest and the midwinter sunset. Excavations in 1828, 1857 and the 1950s revealed pieces of pottery and flint and cremated human bones. The site was obviously of great significance and was possibly reserved for people of high status