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TITLE
Clootie Well, Munlochy
EXTERNAL ID
PC_DONALD_CLOOTIEWELL
PLACENAME
Munlochy
DISTRICT
Avoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Knockbain
DATE OF IMAGE
2002
PERIOD
2000s
SOURCE
Janine Donald
ASSET ID
22339
KEYWORDS
wells
wishing wells
Clootie Well, Munlochy

The 'Clootie Well' is situated at the side of the A832, near Munlochy on the Black Isle. It takes its name from the many 'cloots' or pieces of cloth that are hung around the well.

Some believe the well has healing powers which rid the afflicted of disease, anger, stress, resentment, or even a grudge. It is said that if the diseased part of a body is washed with a rag soaked in the well water, and the rag is then hung up to dry, the disease will fade as the rag diminishes. In the past, wells were visited more frequently, especially at particular times of the year, like Beltane. In the 18th century, for example, the writer and traveller Thomas Pennant recorded many such similar wells in the Highlands, all ''tapestried about with rags'

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Clootie Well, Munlochy

ROSS: Knockbain

2000s

wells; wishing wells

Janine Donald

The 'Clootie Well' is situated at the side of the A832, near Munlochy on the Black Isle. It takes its name from the many 'cloots' or pieces of cloth that are hung around the well. <br /> <br /> Some believe the well has healing powers which rid the afflicted of disease, anger, stress, resentment, or even a grudge. It is said that if the diseased part of a body is washed with a rag soaked in the well water, and the rag is then hung up to dry, the disease will fade as the rag diminishes. In the past, wells were visited more frequently, especially at particular times of the year, like Beltane. In the 18th century, for example, the writer and traveller Thomas Pennant recorded many such similar wells in the Highlands, all ''tapestried about with rags'