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TITLE
Seaforth Coat of Arms, Fortrose
EXTERNAL ID
PC_DONALD_FORTROSE01
PLACENAME
Fortrose
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosemarkie
DATE OF IMAGE
2002
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Janine Donald
SOURCE
Janine Donald
ASSET ID
22370
KEYWORDS
castles
tower houses
Seaforth Coat of Arms, Fortrose

This coat of arms is built into the gable of an old single-storey warehouse on the north side of Station Road, Fortrose. It may be the only surviving relic of Fortrose Castle. The initials 'C B S' can be seen surrounding the rather worn coat of arms. They stand for 'Countess Barbara of Seaforth', wife of George, the second Earl of Seaforth (1633-51).

There are no other visible signs of the castle in Fortrose apart from the street name 'Castle Street'. The original castle was a rectangular tower house built by Bishop Fraser between 1497 and 1507. At the time of the Reformation (1560) it was acquired by the Seaforth Mackenzies who extended and improved it. In 1646 it was besieged by the Convenanters and it later became a garrison for English troops

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Seaforth Coat of Arms, Fortrose

ROSS: Rosemarkie

2000s

castles; tower houses

Janine Donald

This coat of arms is built into the gable of an old single-storey warehouse on the north side of Station Road, Fortrose. It may be the only surviving relic of Fortrose Castle. The initials 'C B S' can be seen surrounding the rather worn coat of arms. They stand for 'Countess Barbara of Seaforth', wife of George, the second Earl of Seaforth (1633-51). <br /> <br /> There are no other visible signs of the castle in Fortrose apart from the street name 'Castle Street'. The original castle was a rectangular tower house built by Bishop Fraser between 1497 and 1507. At the time of the Reformation (1560) it was acquired by the Seaforth Mackenzies who extended and improved it. In 1646 it was besieged by the Convenanters and it later became a garrison for English troops