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TITLE
Inverewe Garden
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GAUKROGER_001
PLACENAME
Inverewe
DISTRICT
Gairloch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Gairloch
DATE OF IMAGE
11 August 2006
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Jamie Gaukroger
SOURCE
Jamie Gaukroger
ASSET ID
22460
KEYWORDS
gardens
plants
horticulture
trees
gardening
Inverewe Garden

Inverewe Garden in located on a small peninsula at Loch Ewe, 1.5 km north of Poolewe.

Inverewe Garden was established by Osgood MacKenzie, the son of Sir Francis MacKenzie, the laird of Gairloch. Osgood MacKenzie was twenty years old when, with his mother's assistance, he purchased the Inverewe and Kernsary estate in 1862. Due to the exposed nature of the location, MacKenzie planted approximately 100 acres of trees on the estate, which created a sheltered environment that allowed him to grow a variety of plant and tree species from around the world. He also reclaimed an area of seashore to create a large walled garden.

After MacKenzie's death in 1922, the garden was maintained and developed by his daughter, Mairi Sawyer. Before her death in 1953, ownership was transferred to the National Trust for Scotland.

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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Inverewe Garden

ROSS: Gairloch

2000s

gardens; plants; horticulture; trees; gardening

Jamie Gaukroger

Inverewe Garden in located on a small peninsula at Loch Ewe, 1.5 km north of Poolewe. <br /> <br /> Inverewe Garden was established by Osgood MacKenzie, the son of Sir Francis MacKenzie, the laird of Gairloch. Osgood MacKenzie was twenty years old when, with his mother's assistance, he purchased the Inverewe and Kernsary estate in 1862. Due to the exposed nature of the location, MacKenzie planted approximately 100 acres of trees on the estate, which created a sheltered environment that allowed him to grow a variety of plant and tree species from around the world. He also reclaimed an area of seashore to create a large walled garden. <br /> <br /> After MacKenzie's death in 1922, the garden was maintained and developed by his daughter, Mairi Sawyer. Before her death in 1953, ownership was transferred to the National Trust for Scotland.