Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
John Fraser, Inverness silversmith (24 of 39)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_SILVERSMITH_24
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
John Fraser
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2248
KEYWORDS
jewellery
jewelry
craftsman
craftsmen
metalwork
silversmiths
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

John Fraser, an Inverness silversmith, served his apprenticeship in the 1930s with Medlock and Craik, watchmakers and jewellers at 6 Bridge Street, Inverness. The firm later had premises in Exchange Place, and Queensgate.

In this audio extract from the 1970s, Mr Fraser recalls an interesting alternative material for casting. The photograph, courtesy of Inverness Museum & Art Gallery (IMAG), is of one of John Fraser's pieces - a Clan Sinclair chieftain's badge with the motto, 'Semper Credens'.

'The other thing that was used was cuttle fish bone; you could buy the cuttle fish, you know, from the suppliers. You could buy big pieces or small pieces. And, you did exactly the same thing: you'd two sections and you imbedded the pattern in one section and then made your sprue out, and your razors for the air and so forth, and you just poured it in the top.

The advantage of cuttle fish really was that if you were working in gold it would give you a much finer casting than sand. It all depended, some of the sand casters that were good could produce an excellent casting. But, if you had any doubts at all, and especially if it was a one-off, cuttle fish was the best thing. You'd put a piece of binding wire around it just to hold it, you know, and then when you got your silver melted just pour it in, or your gold, and the process was the same: you'd just cut the sprue off and then you dressed it up all round'

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

John Fraser, Inverness silversmith (24 of 39)

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1970s

jewellery; jewelry; craftsman; craftsmen; metalwork; silversmiths; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: John Fraser, Silversmith

John Fraser, an Inverness silversmith, served his apprenticeship in the 1930s with Medlock and Craik, watchmakers and jewellers at 6 Bridge Street, Inverness. The firm later had premises in Exchange Place, and Queensgate. <br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the 1970s, Mr Fraser recalls an interesting alternative material for casting. The photograph, courtesy of Inverness Museum & Art Gallery (IMAG), is of one of John Fraser's pieces - a Clan Sinclair chieftain's badge with the motto, 'Semper Credens'.<br /> <br /> 'The other thing that was used was cuttle fish bone; you could buy the cuttle fish, you know, from the suppliers. You could buy big pieces or small pieces. And, you did exactly the same thing: you'd two sections and you imbedded the pattern in one section and then made your sprue out, and your razors for the air and so forth, and you just poured it in the top. <br /> <br /> The advantage of cuttle fish really was that if you were working in gold it would give you a much finer casting than sand. It all depended, some of the sand casters that were good could produce an excellent casting. But, if you had any doubts at all, and especially if it was a one-off, cuttle fish was the best thing. You'd put a piece of binding wire around it just to hold it, you know, and then when you got your silver melted just pour it in, or your gold, and the process was the same: you'd just cut the sprue off and then you dressed it up all round'