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TITLE
John Fraser, Inverness silversmith (31 of 39)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_SILVERSMITH_31
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
John Fraser
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2258
KEYWORDS
jewellery
jewelry
craftsman
craftsmen
metalwork
silversmiths
audio

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John Fraser, an Inverness silversmith, served his apprenticeship in the 1930s with Medlock and Craik, watchmakers and jewellers at 6 Bridge Street, Inverness. The firm later had premises in Exchange Place, and Queensgate.

In this audio extract from the 1970s, Mr Fraser reflects on problems with soldering techniques. The photograph, courtesy of Inverness Museum & Art Gallery (IMAG), is of one of John Fraser's silver pieces - a Clan Fraser badge with the motto, 'Je Suis Prest' (I Am Ready).

'Well, you smelter your brass filings and stuff like that and silver, you put so much silver, so much brass, until you reckon you had the right colour; too much brass and your solder line came up yellow after a while, after it weathered. If you put it somewhere to stand - well, say it was a quaich and you were putting a foot on it - and you used too much brass in the solder then you'd find a yellow line coming up where the solder was. You could polish it out but it would come back up again, after a time, with the atmosphere.

You'd also got to be careful that your solder was clean because if not you'd get porosity in the solder; you'd get little pockets of air and you would get little pinholes in the solder and it looked dirty, you know, especially if it was a job where you could see a solder line. What you would do is, you would melt it down, then you'd run it into the skillet and let it cool. Then you'd take it out and you'd do exactly the same thing as you did with your wire, only instead of putting it through a drawplate you'd put this through a rollers'

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John Fraser, Inverness silversmith (31 of 39)

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1970s

jewellery; jewelry; craftsman; craftsmen; metalwork; silversmiths; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: John Fraser, Silversmith

John Fraser, an Inverness silversmith, served his apprenticeship in the 1930s with Medlock and Craik, watchmakers and jewellers at 6 Bridge Street, Inverness. The firm later had premises in Exchange Place, and Queensgate. <br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the 1970s, Mr Fraser reflects on problems with soldering techniques. The photograph, courtesy of Inverness Museum & Art Gallery (IMAG), is of one of John Fraser's silver pieces - a Clan Fraser badge with the motto, 'Je Suis Prest' (I Am Ready).<br /> <br /> 'Well, you smelter your brass filings and stuff like that and silver, you put so much silver, so much brass, until you reckon you had the right colour; too much brass and your solder line came up yellow after a while, after it weathered. If you put it somewhere to stand - well, say it was a quaich and you were putting a foot on it - and you used too much brass in the solder then you'd find a yellow line coming up where the solder was. You could polish it out but it would come back up again, after a time, with the atmosphere. <br /> <br /> You'd also got to be careful that your solder was clean because if not you'd get porosity in the solder; you'd get little pockets of air and you would get little pinholes in the solder and it looked dirty, you know, especially if it was a job where you could see a solder line. What you would do is, you would melt it down, then you'd run it into the skillet and let it cool. Then you'd take it out and you'd do exactly the same thing as you did with your wire, only instead of putting it through a drawplate you'd put this through a rollers'