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TITLE
On the Ullapool to Lochinver Road
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GHENDRY_044
PLACENAME
Ullapool
DISTRICT
Lochbroom
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochbroom
SOURCE
George Hendry
ASSET ID
22588
KEYWORDS
landscapes
coasts
On the Ullapool to Lochinver Road

This photograph shows a view from the A835, the road between Ullapool and Loch Inver, across Loch Kinaird and out to the Isle of Martin, with the Summer Isles just visible beyond the island's southern tip. Beinn More Coigach (2285 ft) can be seen in the background.

Isle Martin was named after St Martin, who is reputed to have established a monastery on the island in the fourth century. By the eighteenth century a thriving fishing industry sprung up on the island, and as many as a hundred people resided there. Crofting went hand in hand with the fishing industry and the island was divided into crofting tenures. Cattle and sheep grazing predominated, with only a small amount of land set aside for arable usage.

In 1979, the island was gifted by Monica Goldsmith to the RSPB, who, after twenty years of overseeing the island, gifted it in 1999 to a trust formed by the communities of Loch Broom and Coigeach. The island is presently uninhabited.

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On the Ullapool to Lochinver Road

ROSS: Lochbroom

landscapes; coasts

George Hendry

This photograph shows a view from the A835, the road between Ullapool and Loch Inver, across Loch Kinaird and out to the Isle of Martin, with the Summer Isles just visible beyond the island's southern tip. Beinn More Coigach (2285 ft) can be seen in the background. <br /> <br /> Isle Martin was named after St Martin, who is reputed to have established a monastery on the island in the fourth century. By the eighteenth century a thriving fishing industry sprung up on the island, and as many as a hundred people resided there. Crofting went hand in hand with the fishing industry and the island was divided into crofting tenures. Cattle and sheep grazing predominated, with only a small amount of land set aside for arable usage. <br /> <br /> In 1979, the island was gifted by Monica Goldsmith to the RSPB, who, after twenty years of overseeing the island, gifted it in 1999 to a trust formed by the communities of Loch Broom and Coigeach. The island is presently uninhabited.