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TITLE
Suilven and Canisp from Lochinver
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GHENDRY_071
PLACENAME
Lochinver
DISTRICT
Assynt
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Assynt
SOURCE
George Hendry
ASSET ID
22615
KEYWORDS
Suilven and Canisp from Lochinver

This photograph shows a view across to the mountains of Suilven, on the left, and Canisp, on the right. They are both located in the parish of Assynt and the county of Sutherland.

Suilven is one of Highlands' most distinctive mountains. Like many of the mountains in the region, it is composed primarily of Torridonian red sandstone, and consists of two peaks: Meall Meadhonach, 723 m (2410 feet); and Caisteal Liath, 731 m (2440 feet). The mountain is a popular destination for hikers.

Canisp is a corbett of 2779 feet and derived its name from the Old Norse for 'white mountain'. Typical of many other Assynt hills, it emerges from a base of Lewisian Gneiss and is composed of Torridonian sandstone capped by Cambrian quartzite. The mountain can be ascended via several routes but it is a less popular destination than nearby Suilven.

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Suilven and Canisp from Lochinver

SUTHERLAND: Assynt

George Hendry

This photograph shows a view across to the mountains of Suilven, on the left, and Canisp, on the right. They are both located in the parish of Assynt and the county of Sutherland.<br /> <br /> Suilven is one of Highlands' most distinctive mountains. Like many of the mountains in the region, it is composed primarily of Torridonian red sandstone, and consists of two peaks: Meall Meadhonach, 723 m (2410 feet); and Caisteal Liath, 731 m (2440 feet). The mountain is a popular destination for hikers.<br /> <br /> Canisp is a corbett of 2779 feet and derived its name from the Old Norse for 'white mountain'. Typical of many other Assynt hills, it emerges from a base of Lewisian Gneiss and is composed of Torridonian sandstone capped by Cambrian quartzite. The mountain can be ascended via several routes but it is a less popular destination than nearby Suilven.