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TITLE
Loch Ness at Drumnadrochit
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GHENDRY_100
PLACENAME
Drumnadrochit
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
SOURCE
George Hendry
ASSET ID
22643
KEYWORDS
Loch Ness at Drumnadrochit

A view across Loch Ness from Drumnadrochit, looking towards the south shore and the ruins of Urquhart Castle. The castle dates back to the thirteenth century, where evidence of its existence originates from the fact that it was captured by King Edward I of England in 1296. It is currently under the ownership of the National Trust of Scotland and run by Historic Scotland.

Loch Ness is best known today for being the home of the alleged Loch Ness monster. Thousands of tourists descend on the lake yearly to catch a fleeting glimpse of the phantom. However, perhaps the most extraordinary quality of the Loch is its great depth at 230 m (754 feet). The second largest loch in Scotland by area, because of its impressive depth it is the greatest by volume.

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Loch Ness at Drumnadrochit

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

George Hendry

A view across Loch Ness from Drumnadrochit, looking towards the south shore and the ruins of Urquhart Castle. The castle dates back to the thirteenth century, where evidence of its existence originates from the fact that it was captured by King Edward I of England in 1296. It is currently under the ownership of the National Trust of Scotland and run by Historic Scotland. <br /> <br /> Loch Ness is best known today for being the home of the alleged Loch Ness monster. Thousands of tourists descend on the lake yearly to catch a fleeting glimpse of the phantom. However, perhaps the most extraordinary quality of the Loch is its great depth at 230 m (754 feet). The second largest loch in Scotland by area, because of its impressive depth it is the greatest by volume.