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TITLE
Lewiston 1801
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_DMACDONALD_MAPS_001
PLACENAME
Lewiston
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1801
PERIOD
1800s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22648
KEYWORDS
post office
Drumnadrochit
William Cumming
Glass
moor
pasture
William Cameron
William Mackenzie
William Mackintosh
Charles Edward Stuart
zoomable images

In the early 19th Century, the agricultural system of crofting (where the land was divided into small allotments) which had sustained Scotland for centuries was giving way to a new system of large-scale farming. These trends are demonstrated in this map of central Glenurquhart. The map covers the area from the River Coiltie (spelt Kyltie here) to Balmacaiv (probably a misspelling of Balmacaan) and bordered on top by Cul An Loan. Lewiston was a central industrial area of Glenurquhart, but the mills are not labelled in this map. The key to the map indicates that dividing land into 'arable' (for crops) and 'pasture' (for feeding livestock) is the most important function, and the map gives far more emphasis on highlighting areas of pasture than labelling the buildings.

Whilst the marginalisation of the tenants was an unpleasant feature of this age, Glenurquhart was relatively lucky in having Good Sir James Grant as its Laird at the time. Grant introduced the method of 'rotating' crops to maximise the yield of the ground. This is partially why the map has a strong emphasis on improving ground. In previous centuries there was little that could be done to improve land, but the agricultural revolution meant that advances in chemistry meant that soil could be fertilised and planted with soil fixing vegetation. When these plants were rotated then the soil would be enriched. As well as these scientific advances there were also advances in manufacturing farm implements. This meant that ploughs no longer needed to be pulled by several oxen, but could be pulled by one horse.

Given that the clearances are often viewed as being synonymous with the Jacobite rebellion, it is interesting that the Mackintosh family of Moy (who supported the Jacobites) are mentioned as owning the neighbouring land. The feudal aristocratic system was not greatly disrupted by the Jacobite rebellion, and many families which had aided Charles Edward Stewart retained their ancestral land.

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Lewiston 1801

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1800s

post office; Drumnadrochit; William Cumming; Glass; moor; pasture; William Cameron; William Mackenzie; William Mackintosh; Charles Edward Stuart; zoomable images

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

In the early 19th Century, the agricultural system of crofting (where the land was divided into small allotments) which had sustained Scotland for centuries was giving way to a new system of large-scale farming. These trends are demonstrated in this map of central Glenurquhart. The map covers the area from the River Coiltie (spelt Kyltie here) to Balmacaiv (probably a misspelling of Balmacaan) and bordered on top by Cul An Loan. Lewiston was a central industrial area of Glenurquhart, but the mills are not labelled in this map. The key to the map indicates that dividing land into 'arable' (for crops) and 'pasture' (for feeding livestock) is the most important function, and the map gives far more emphasis on highlighting areas of pasture than labelling the buildings. <br /> <br /> Whilst the marginalisation of the tenants was an unpleasant feature of this age, Glenurquhart was relatively lucky in having Good Sir James Grant as its Laird at the time. Grant introduced the method of 'rotating' crops to maximise the yield of the ground. This is partially why the map has a strong emphasis on improving ground. In previous centuries there was little that could be done to improve land, but the agricultural revolution meant that advances in chemistry meant that soil could be fertilised and planted with soil fixing vegetation. When these plants were rotated then the soil would be enriched. As well as these scientific advances there were also advances in manufacturing farm implements. This meant that ploughs no longer needed to be pulled by several oxen, but could be pulled by one horse. <br /> <br /> Given that the clearances are often viewed as being synonymous with the Jacobite rebellion, it is interesting that the Mackintosh family of Moy (who supported the Jacobites) are mentioned as owning the neighbouring land. The feudal aristocratic system was not greatly disrupted by the Jacobite rebellion, and many families which had aided Charles Edward Stewart retained their ancestral land.