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TITLE
Road Map Temple etc 1798 (Ruiskich/ Urquhart Bay)
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_DMACDONALD_MAPS_003
PLACENAME
Glenurquhart
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1798
PERIOD
1790s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22650
KEYWORDS
survey
Drumnadrochit
Great Glen
Loch Ness
zoomable

Transportation from Inverness to Fort Augustus through Glenurquhart was a vital project during the 18th Century. This seems to be designed by the government because the private maps of this era placed a strong emphasis upon land use, especially the capacity for grazing sheep. This map depicts the area from Abriachan (about 5 miles Eastward) to the Coiltie river. As with many areas the Coiltie is spelt differently on this document as Koyltie. Other significant places with names that are spelt differently from the modern standard include: Enriag (Enrick), Coulinloan (Cul an Loan) and Bailmacan (Balmacaan). This is because the standardisation of Gaelic spelling into a Latin alphabet is a fairly recent development. The land above Drumnadrochit Inn is not illustrated in detail.

There is some detail of the land outside Glenurquhart. The rock face beside the Loch side is described as 'perpendicular'. This is a geometrical term meaning vertical, which implies that someone with training in engineering might have written a lot of the terms. A burial ground beneath Abriachan is noted down. This is a very ancient site and there is a shrine to St Columba beside the A82. It can be seen that at one stage the hill above the roadside was more accessible than the shore side, which was densely populated with birch trees.

By contrast a lot of the more significant areas of Glenurquhart are not given much detail. This is most significantly demonstrated at Milton, which at this time would have been the central industrial area of the town, but which only gets an abbreviated title. In Glenurquhart itself, this map is interesting for showing Lewiston, a very early industrial village, as being a distance from the Coiltie River. It was later moved to be closer to the water supply.

Both Milton and Lewiston were created by Sir James Grant, who became known as 'the good' for helping the people of Glenurquhart by building mills and importing food during a famine. The map inscribes his ownership on the hills above Glenurquhart. The opposite side of the Loch also has some detail and it was apparently the site of the Lovat estate.

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Road Map Temple etc 1798 (Ruiskich/ Urquhart Bay)

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1790s

survey; Drumnadrochit; Great Glen; Loch Ness; zoomable

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

Transportation from Inverness to Fort Augustus through Glenurquhart was a vital project during the 18th Century. This seems to be designed by the government because the private maps of this era placed a strong emphasis upon land use, especially the capacity for grazing sheep. This map depicts the area from Abriachan (about 5 miles Eastward) to the Coiltie river. As with many areas the Coiltie is spelt differently on this document as Koyltie. Other significant places with names that are spelt differently from the modern standard include: Enriag (Enrick), Coulinloan (Cul an Loan) and Bailmacan (Balmacaan). This is because the standardisation of Gaelic spelling into a Latin alphabet is a fairly recent development. The land above Drumnadrochit Inn is not illustrated in detail. <br /> <br /> There is some detail of the land outside Glenurquhart. The rock face beside the Loch side is described as 'perpendicular'. This is a geometrical term meaning vertical, which implies that someone with training in engineering might have written a lot of the terms. A burial ground beneath Abriachan is noted down. This is a very ancient site and there is a shrine to St Columba beside the A82. It can be seen that at one stage the hill above the roadside was more accessible than the shore side, which was densely populated with birch trees. <br /> <br /> By contrast a lot of the more significant areas of Glenurquhart are not given much detail. This is most significantly demonstrated at Milton, which at this time would have been the central industrial area of the town, but which only gets an abbreviated title. In Glenurquhart itself, this map is interesting for showing Lewiston, a very early industrial village, as being a distance from the Coiltie River. It was later moved to be closer to the water supply. <br /> <br /> Both Milton and Lewiston were created by Sir James Grant, who became known as 'the good' for helping the people of Glenurquhart by building mills and importing food during a famine. The map inscribes his ownership on the hills above Glenurquhart. The opposite side of the Loch also has some detail and it was apparently the site of the Lovat estate.