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TITLE
Milton 1903
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_DMACDONALD_MAPS_004
PLACENAME
Milton
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1903
PERIOD
1900s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22651
KEYWORDS
Drumnadrochit
Carrachan
smithy
mill
mills
zoomable images

This map dates from the 20th Century and is very detailed. It contains (going anti-Clockwise) the area of Drumbuie on the right, Garbeg Wood, Balnagrantoch and Milton. Whilst previous maps placed a strong emphasis on developing and improving land, this one does not suggest changing the topography. In contrast to the early 19th Century maps this one does not label areas of ground which are suitable for pasture.

It can be seen that the developments of the 19th Century had a limited impact upon Glenurquhart. There are still large areas of wooded land and rocky slopes. In the 19th Century the capacity for developing land was tempered by a surprisingly precocious view of the necessity of preserving areas of wilderness. Subsequently the Highlands became (and remain to this day) largely dependent upon tourism for income.

There is a slight irony that after making a great effort to maximise the grazing capacity of the area, the primitive forests and moors remain a major asset. As well as greater respect for the forests there also seems to be greater respect for ancient monuments as Cairn Daley is labelled with an intricate font. Despite this, there are also signs that technology was important in the development of the area because there are several gravel pits. These would have been used to provide material for local roads. The increasing relation between Inverness and other towns meant that trade had become very important. The Loch provided the major route for trade, but horse drawn carts would be important for distributing through the town.

Beneath the map there is a caveat that the roads represented do not imply a right of way. At this time restrictions on travel would be more severe because most of the land would be owned by estates. After the Second World War most of the Seafield estate was broken up and sold to individuals and the government.

The map was created by the Ordnance Survey, who remain the leading authorities on cartography. This organisation was established after the Jacobite Rebellion and its initial task was to map out Scotland so that it would be easier to control and march across.

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Milton 1903

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1900s

Drumnadrochit; Carrachan; smithy; mill; mills; zoomable images

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

This map dates from the 20th Century and is very detailed. It contains (going anti-Clockwise) the area of Drumbuie on the right, Garbeg Wood, Balnagrantoch and Milton. Whilst previous maps placed a strong emphasis on developing and improving land, this one does not suggest changing the topography. In contrast to the early 19th Century maps this one does not label areas of ground which are suitable for pasture. <br /> <br /> It can be seen that the developments of the 19th Century had a limited impact upon Glenurquhart. There are still large areas of wooded land and rocky slopes. In the 19th Century the capacity for developing land was tempered by a surprisingly precocious view of the necessity of preserving areas of wilderness. Subsequently the Highlands became (and remain to this day) largely dependent upon tourism for income. <br /> <br /> There is a slight irony that after making a great effort to maximise the grazing capacity of the area, the primitive forests and moors remain a major asset. As well as greater respect for the forests there also seems to be greater respect for ancient monuments as Cairn Daley is labelled with an intricate font. Despite this, there are also signs that technology was important in the development of the area because there are several gravel pits. These would have been used to provide material for local roads. The increasing relation between Inverness and other towns meant that trade had become very important. The Loch provided the major route for trade, but horse drawn carts would be important for distributing through the town. <br /> <br /> Beneath the map there is a caveat that the roads represented do not imply a right of way. At this time restrictions on travel would be more severe because most of the land would be owned by estates. After the Second World War most of the Seafield estate was broken up and sold to individuals and the government. <br /> <br /> The map was created by the Ordnance Survey, who remain the leading authorities on cartography. This organisation was established after the Jacobite Rebellion and its initial task was to map out Scotland so that it would be easier to control and march across.