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TITLE
Polmaily & Achmony
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_DMACDONALD_MAPS_005
PLACENAME
Glenurquhart
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1903
PERIOD
1900s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22652
KEYWORDS
loch an sgor
gaoithe
quarry
upper gartally
laggantrottan
River Enrick
waterfall
Achnababan
zoomable images

This map depicts Polmaily and Achmony. This map is bounded by Balnagrantoch, Milton, Rychraggan and Achtemarach. There is an indication that land use in the area had changed substantially in recent years. The mining of natural resources would be a comparatively recent development, but some of the mines seem to have gone out of use. One place is marked as 'old quarries', another as 'old lime kiln'. This could be due to the fact that rock in the area contains many impurities, and that carrying rock was itself a difficult task. The 19th Century saw a decline in Glenurquhart's population and so construction work would not have been substantial.

Other features of the map demonstrate different use oaf natural resources. A lime kiln indicates that the area's lime was a natural asset. This is a sedimentary rock which indicates that Glenurquhart was once under water. Limestone is primarily composed of calcium carbonate, an organic compound derived from primitive sea creatures. This rock could be converted into lime, a substance which can increase soil fertility due to its calcium content. This illustrates that agricultural technology was comparatively advanced in Glenurquhart. Soil rotation and artificial fertilisers were introduced to the area by 'Good' Sir James Grant in the late 18th Century, who had a large impact on attitudes to farming in the area.

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Polmaily & Achmony

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1900s

loch an sgor; gaoithe; quarry; upper gartally; laggantrottan; River Enrick; waterfall; Achnababan; zoomable images

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

This map depicts Polmaily and Achmony. This map is bounded by Balnagrantoch, Milton, Rychraggan and Achtemarach. There is an indication that land use in the area had changed substantially in recent years. The mining of natural resources would be a comparatively recent development, but some of the mines seem to have gone out of use. One place is marked as 'old quarries', another as 'old lime kiln'. This could be due to the fact that rock in the area contains many impurities, and that carrying rock was itself a difficult task. The 19th Century saw a decline in Glenurquhart's population and so construction work would not have been substantial. <br /> <br /> Other features of the map demonstrate different use oaf natural resources. A lime kiln indicates that the area's lime was a natural asset. This is a sedimentary rock which indicates that Glenurquhart was once under water. Limestone is primarily composed of calcium carbonate, an organic compound derived from primitive sea creatures. This rock could be converted into lime, a substance which can increase soil fertility due to its calcium content. This illustrates that agricultural technology was comparatively advanced in Glenurquhart. Soil rotation and artificial fertilisers were introduced to the area by 'Good' Sir James Grant in the late 18th Century, who had a large impact on attitudes to farming in the area.