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TITLE
L'Arche Pilgrimage
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_DUNCANMACDONALD_006
PLACENAME
Kilmichael
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1986
PERIOD
1980s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22656
KEYWORDS
Bart Beaul, church, pilgrim, pilgrims, Glenurquhart, Drumnadrochit, Church of Scotland, Free Church, events, ponies, livestock, religion, horses, disabilities
L'Arche Pilgrimage

For the people of Glenurquhart, as with many other Scottish villages, faith played an important role in the community. This photograph shows the L'Arche pilgrimage outside Kilmichael United Free Church. L'Arche is French for 'the ark', in memory of Noah. It is a Christian organisation which was founded in Canada for helping people with learning difficulties. The carts are drawn by ponies from Borlum farm, which is well known for its equine livestock.

The Rev. Bart Beaul is shown in the far left of the photograph.

The Free Church of Scotland was created after the disruption, in which the Church of Scotland risked schism due to the system that it used to elect its ministers. Originally, the Church of Scotland democratically elected people for the ministry. The Scottish state passed an act in 1712 known as the Patronage Act, which allowed landlords to appoint their own ministers.

This was controversial because it seemed to go against many of the Biblical commandments in that it took power away form the people. Both the United Presbyterian Church and the Free Church arose from these disputes and demanded to elect their own ministers. Members of these congregations merged to form the United Free Church.

Most of the parishioners of the United Free Church reunited with the Church of Scotland, after the Patronage Act was abolished, but some members continue independence. This is because of 'voluntarism', which is an opposition to the state providing assistance to the Church of Scotland, which the United Free Church believes is not in keeping with biblical commandments.

Despite this, the two churches are very similar. Both use the same mode of Gothic architecture, and base their theological ideals upon the work of John Calvin, a Swiss theologian. Calvin taught that salvation is found through faith rather than works, and opposed an Episcopal system of governing the Church by Bishops.

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L'Arche Pilgrimage

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1980s

Bart Beaul, church, pilgrim, pilgrims, Glenurquhart, Drumnadrochit, Church of Scotland, Free Church, events, ponies, livestock, religion, horses, disabilities

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (photographs)

For the people of Glenurquhart, as with many other Scottish villages, faith played an important role in the community. This photograph shows the L'Arche pilgrimage outside Kilmichael United Free Church. L'Arche is French for 'the ark', in memory of Noah. It is a Christian organisation which was founded in Canada for helping people with learning difficulties. The carts are drawn by ponies from Borlum farm, which is well known for its equine livestock.<br /> <br /> The Rev. Bart Beaul is shown in the far left of the photograph.<br /> <br /> The Free Church of Scotland was created after the disruption, in which the Church of Scotland risked schism due to the system that it used to elect its ministers. Originally, the Church of Scotland democratically elected people for the ministry. The Scottish state passed an act in 1712 known as the Patronage Act, which allowed landlords to appoint their own ministers. <br /> <br /> This was controversial because it seemed to go against many of the Biblical commandments in that it took power away form the people. Both the United Presbyterian Church and the Free Church arose from these disputes and demanded to elect their own ministers. Members of these congregations merged to form the United Free Church.<br /> <br /> Most of the parishioners of the United Free Church reunited with the Church of Scotland, after the Patronage Act was abolished, but some members continue independence. This is because of 'voluntarism', which is an opposition to the state providing assistance to the Church of Scotland, which the United Free Church believes is not in keeping with biblical commandments. <br /> <br /> Despite this, the two churches are very similar. Both use the same mode of Gothic architecture, and base their theological ideals upon the work of John Calvin, a Swiss theologian. Calvin taught that salvation is found through faith rather than works, and opposed an Episcopal system of governing the Church by Bishops.