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TITLE
Mrs Bradley Martin Photographing Cars at End of Season
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_DUNCANMACDONALD_011
PLACENAME
Balmacaan House
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22661
KEYWORDS
vehicles
transport
shooting
hunting,
Mrs Bradley Martin Photographing Cars at End of Season

The late 19th and early 20th Centuries were marked by the industrial revolution, which had a strong social impact. Whilst estates had previously been exclusively for hereditary nobility, the new industrialist class began to move into the country areas as well.

The Victorian era saw renewed interest in hunting, and modern trends transformed this area of country life. From the late 19th Century to the mid-20th Century new methods were utilised to maximise the potential that an estate had for hunting. The 19th Century was greatly influenced by Darwin's studies into genetic inheritance, and new breeds of animals were created more rapidly than previously. A special type of dog was bred in Glenurquhart especially for game hunting, which was a cross between a deer hound and a collie.

Despite specialised dog breeding, improved gun manufacture meant that dogs were no longer of great importance to hunters. The development of weapons also meant that a large amount of game would be killed in a single day. For this reason estates went from being comparatively simple to employing a vast range of head keepers, underkeepers, ghillies and beaters.

Maybe it appears slightly paradoxical that there are so many motor cars came at Balmacaan estate, given the rarity of automobiles and the remoteness of the location. However, the social norms of the time meant that it was common for wealthy and fashionable people to socialise in remote places.

The lady in the fur coat is Mrs Bradley Martin, who is using a camera to photograph the automobiles as they prepare to leave. This photograph demonstrates that Balmacaan estate went from being a slightly neglected area of Scotland to becoming a modern and cosmopolitan area during the tenancy of the Martin family.

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Mrs Bradley Martin Photographing Cars at End of Season

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

vehicles; transport; shooting; hunting,

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (photographs)

The late 19th and early 20th Centuries were marked by the industrial revolution, which had a strong social impact. Whilst estates had previously been exclusively for hereditary nobility, the new industrialist class began to move into the country areas as well. <br /> <br /> The Victorian era saw renewed interest in hunting, and modern trends transformed this area of country life. From the late 19th Century to the mid-20th Century new methods were utilised to maximise the potential that an estate had for hunting. The 19th Century was greatly influenced by Darwin's studies into genetic inheritance, and new breeds of animals were created more rapidly than previously. A special type of dog was bred in Glenurquhart especially for game hunting, which was a cross between a deer hound and a collie. <br /> <br /> Despite specialised dog breeding, improved gun manufacture meant that dogs were no longer of great importance to hunters. The development of weapons also meant that a large amount of game would be killed in a single day. For this reason estates went from being comparatively simple to employing a vast range of head keepers, underkeepers, ghillies and beaters. <br /> <br /> Maybe it appears slightly paradoxical that there are so many motor cars came at Balmacaan estate, given the rarity of automobiles and the remoteness of the location. However, the social norms of the time meant that it was common for wealthy and fashionable people to socialise in remote places. <br /> <br /> The lady in the fur coat is Mrs Bradley Martin, who is using a camera to photograph the automobiles as they prepare to leave. This photograph demonstrates that Balmacaan estate went from being a slightly neglected area of Scotland to becoming a modern and cosmopolitan area during the tenancy of the Martin family.