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TITLE
'Sandy the Carrier' and Family in East Lewiston
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_DUNCANMACDONALD_015
PLACENAME
East Lewiston
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22665
KEYWORDS
Glenurquhart, Drumnadrochit, Loch Ness, carter, trade
'Sandy the Carrier' and Family in East Lewiston

This photograph depicts a carrier (a Scots word for carter) at Coiltyside, East Lewiston, Glenurquhart. The gentleman has been identfied as Alexander MacDonald. His wife and one of his daughters are standing behind the chair.

Known as 'Sandy the Carrier', Alexander MacDonald was born around 1846 in Urquhart, the son of crofter John MacDonald and his wife, Ann Beaton. In 1876 he married Margaret Jane McKenzie. The couple lived at Coiltyside all of their lives, raising a family of nine. Margaret died in 1928 and Sandy in 1932.

Coiltyside had been the McKenzie's family home since 1800 when the family moved to Lewsiton from Fort Augustus. Margaret Jane McKenzie was the daughter of William McKenzie, a carpenter and precentor. William's father, William McKenzie (c1764-1837) was a carpenter, session clerk, and one of the 'Men of Glenurquhart' (religious purists).

In remote villages like Glenurquhart trading and carrying between different areas was often strenuous work. The family portrayed in this photograph contributed greatly to the Glenurquhart community.

Because the village of Glenurquhart has a shallow coastline and a pier several hundred yards outside of the town, the carrier's main work was to transport goods from ships at temple pier. Before petrol motors were the common mode of transport, the Loch was the main root for conveying merchandise.

The creation of Lewiston was supervised in 1767 by one of the Seafields called Sir James Grant who was also the founder of Grantown and Milton.

Sir James is often credited with saving the area from the worst difficulties of the post-Jacobite social problems in the Highlands of Scotland. Primarily, the difficulty was a growing trend to focus agriculture on large farms with minimum staff. This meant that the old feudal system, in which a clan submitted to a chief, but owned their small fields, was no longer viable.

Seeing that the landowning system based on smallholdings was being swept aside, James Grant helped to patronise artisans in the Glenurquhart region, and change its emphasis from a farming community to one with a large manufacturing base. This is why Milton and Lewiston were relatively successful, and Glenurquhart was not depopulated to the extent of the surrounding areas during the clearances.

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'Sandy the Carrier' and Family in East Lewiston

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

Glenurquhart, Drumnadrochit, Loch Ness, carter, trade

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (photographs)

This photograph depicts a carrier (a Scots word for carter) at Coiltyside, East Lewiston, Glenurquhart. The gentleman has been identfied as Alexander MacDonald. His wife and one of his daughters are standing behind the chair.<br /> <br /> Known as 'Sandy the Carrier', Alexander MacDonald was born around 1846 in Urquhart, the son of crofter John MacDonald and his wife, Ann Beaton. In 1876 he married Margaret Jane McKenzie. The couple lived at Coiltyside all of their lives, raising a family of nine. Margaret died in 1928 and Sandy in 1932.<br /> <br /> Coiltyside had been the McKenzie's family home since 1800 when the family moved to Lewsiton from Fort Augustus. Margaret Jane McKenzie was the daughter of William McKenzie, a carpenter and precentor. William's father, William McKenzie (c1764-1837) was a carpenter, session clerk, and one of the 'Men of Glenurquhart' (religious purists). <br /> <br /> In remote villages like Glenurquhart trading and carrying between different areas was often strenuous work. The family portrayed in this photograph contributed greatly to the Glenurquhart community.<br /> <br /> Because the village of Glenurquhart has a shallow coastline and a pier several hundred yards outside of the town, the carrier's main work was to transport goods from ships at temple pier. Before petrol motors were the common mode of transport, the Loch was the main root for conveying merchandise. <br /> <br /> The creation of Lewiston was supervised in 1767 by one of the Seafields called Sir James Grant who was also the founder of Grantown and Milton.<br /> <br /> Sir James is often credited with saving the area from the worst difficulties of the post-Jacobite social problems in the Highlands of Scotland. Primarily, the difficulty was a growing trend to focus agriculture on large farms with minimum staff. This meant that the old feudal system, in which a clan submitted to a chief, but owned their small fields, was no longer viable.<br /> <br /> Seeing that the landowning system based on smallholdings was being swept aside, James Grant helped to patronise artisans in the Glenurquhart region, and change its emphasis from a farming community to one with a large manufacturing base. This is why Milton and Lewiston were relatively successful, and Glenurquhart was not depopulated to the extent of the surrounding areas during the clearances.