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TITLE
Cruck Barn in Balbeg
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_HERITAGEGROUP_001
PLACENAME
Balbeg
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
PERIOD
1910s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22666
KEYWORDS
Glenurquhart
Drumnadrochit
rafters
architecture
farming
farm
Cruck Barn in Balbeg

Crofting has always been an important feature of life in Glenurquhart and other rural areas. Barns have been of great traditional importance as a means of storing implements and crops. This photograph depicts a cruck barn in the region of Balbeg.

Whilst the model has been modified, the basic construction of this type of barn dates from the medieval times. The barn is named for its use of 'crucks' which are pairs of timbers that extend from the roof to the floor. In fact many crofters who were forced to move to another location would take the roof timbers with them. The roof is made of thatched heather, which provided strong insulation during the winter. The construction was held together by wooden pegs.

The Balbeg crofts were largely settled by the MacDonald families, who moved from the Choire Dho settlement in Glenmoriston.

The movement of Scottish peasants towards crofting was largely the result of the Highland Clearances, where Scots were evicted from their larger farming communities.

A croft is a small-holding, and the 1886 Crofters Act, under the Gladstone government, gave the crofters special rights of tenure. It was in this year that the Crofters Commission was also established, to protect the rights of the Scottish Peasants who were being driven out of their land.

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Cruck Barn in Balbeg

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1910s

Glenurquhart; Drumnadrochit; rafters; architecture; farming; farm;

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (photographs)

Crofting has always been an important feature of life in Glenurquhart and other rural areas. Barns have been of great traditional importance as a means of storing implements and crops. This photograph depicts a cruck barn in the region of Balbeg. <br /> <br /> Whilst the model has been modified, the basic construction of this type of barn dates from the medieval times. The barn is named for its use of 'crucks' which are pairs of timbers that extend from the roof to the floor. In fact many crofters who were forced to move to another location would take the roof timbers with them. The roof is made of thatched heather, which provided strong insulation during the winter. The construction was held together by wooden pegs. <br /> <br /> The Balbeg crofts were largely settled by the MacDonald families, who moved from the Choire Dho settlement in Glenmoriston.<br /> <br /> The movement of Scottish peasants towards crofting was largely the result of the Highland Clearances, where Scots were evicted from their larger farming communities.<br /> <br /> A croft is a small-holding, and the 1886 Crofters Act, under the Gladstone government, gave the crofters special rights of tenure. It was in this year that the Crofters Commission was also established, to protect the rights of the Scottish Peasants who were being driven out of their land.