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TITLE
Drumnadrochit Showing Achmony Hill
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_HERITAGEGROUP_003
PLACENAME
Drumnadrochit
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
PERIOD
1920s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22668
KEYWORDS
Glenurquhart, the green, cart, bridge
Drumnadrochit Showing Achmony Hill

Glenurquhart has been well suited to farming because it is built on a plane, and possesses good soil. The hill above the village is called Auchmony, and is rich in lime deposits. This is one of the reasons why agriculture in Glenurquhart became so well developed. Trees grow very thickly on the hill, which is possibly a sign of the quality of the earth, though lime does not always enrich growth in its natural state.

In the foreground to this photograph is an area of Glenurquhart known as the Green. When this photograph was taken, this area was in a transitional period. Previously it had been used as a site for marts and the sale of livestock. Since the earliest recorded days of Glenurquhart, the area around the Green was noted for being fertile, and a good site for cattle trysts, or marts. Usually these cattle were taken west to Muir of Ord. At the time of this photograph the houses of Glenurquhart were built quite thickly around this area, and so it no longer had this function.

In the years after this photograph was taken, the Green was used as a park for the inhabitants of Glenurquhart. Not everyone in Glenurquhart was keen for this to be a communal area, and a fence was erected around it, the vestiges of which can be seen. However, a local cobbler tore a section down, and others continued with this, until only a few pegs were left.

The oldest house in the area is the one second from the left. This house is known as Greenlee and was constructed in the early 1800s.

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Drumnadrochit Showing Achmony Hill

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1920s

Glenurquhart, the green, cart, bridge

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (photographs)

Glenurquhart has been well suited to farming because it is built on a plane, and possesses good soil. The hill above the village is called Auchmony, and is rich in lime deposits. This is one of the reasons why agriculture in Glenurquhart became so well developed. Trees grow very thickly on the hill, which is possibly a sign of the quality of the earth, though lime does not always enrich growth in its natural state.<br /> <br /> In the foreground to this photograph is an area of Glenurquhart known as the Green. When this photograph was taken, this area was in a transitional period. Previously it had been used as a site for marts and the sale of livestock. Since the earliest recorded days of Glenurquhart, the area around the Green was noted for being fertile, and a good site for cattle trysts, or marts. Usually these cattle were taken west to Muir of Ord. At the time of this photograph the houses of Glenurquhart were built quite thickly around this area, and so it no longer had this function. <br /> <br /> In the years after this photograph was taken, the Green was used as a park for the inhabitants of Glenurquhart. Not everyone in Glenurquhart was keen for this to be a communal area, and a fence was erected around it, the vestiges of which can be seen. However, a local cobbler tore a section down, and others continued with this, until only a few pegs were left. <br /> <br /> The oldest house in the area is the one second from the left. This house is known as Greenlee and was constructed in the early 1800s.