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TITLE
Paddle Steamer 'Glengarry'
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_HERITAGEGROUP_016
PLACENAME
Loch Ness
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22683
KEYWORDS
ships
boats
steam
transport
tourism
paddle<br />
Paddle Steamer 'Glengarry'

Ever since the Caledonian Canal was created in the 1820s, water based transport has been a popular means of travel both for tourists and for locals. The loch was, for many people, the easiest mode of transport from the 1900s until the late 1920s when new roads and increased mechanisation of transport meant that bus trips became a cheaper alternative. As the canal stretched from Inverness to Fort William, it was one of the easiest methods of getting from the east to the west coast of Scotland, and vice versa.

The SS Glengarry was a paddle steamer which often sailed around the Loch, from Inverness to Fort Augustus. Initially when when it started sailing the Caledonian Canal in 1847 it was called 'The Edinburgh Castle', but it was renamed in the 1870s.

A paddle steamer used a steam engine to rotate a wheel, or paddle, which propelled it along the waterway. The wheel is on the side of the boat, of a design known as a 'side-wheeler', meaning that the paddle wheel was mounted on the side. A 'back wheeler', with the paddle on the back, which was more frequently used by river boats because it was narrower. From 1895 the Glengarry was primarily used for a mail run between Fort Augustus and Inverness.

The Glengarry was notable for having a very long lifespan for a steamer, being broken up after 83 years of service. It was operated by David MacBrayne Ltd, a forerunner of Caledonian MacBrayne.

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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Paddle Steamer 'Glengarry'

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

ships; boats; steam; transport; tourism; paddle<br />

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (photographs)

Ever since the Caledonian Canal was created in the 1820s, water based transport has been a popular means of travel both for tourists and for locals. The loch was, for many people, the easiest mode of transport from the 1900s until the late 1920s when new roads and increased mechanisation of transport meant that bus trips became a cheaper alternative. As the canal stretched from Inverness to Fort William, it was one of the easiest methods of getting from the east to the west coast of Scotland, and vice versa. <br /> <br /> The SS Glengarry was a paddle steamer which often sailed around the Loch, from Inverness to Fort Augustus. Initially when when it started sailing the Caledonian Canal in 1847 it was called 'The Edinburgh Castle', but it was renamed in the 1870s. <br /> <br /> A paddle steamer used a steam engine to rotate a wheel, or paddle, which propelled it along the waterway. The wheel is on the side of the boat, of a design known as a 'side-wheeler', meaning that the paddle wheel was mounted on the side. A 'back wheeler', with the paddle on the back, which was more frequently used by river boats because it was narrower. From 1895 the Glengarry was primarily used for a mail run between Fort Augustus and Inverness. <br /> <br /> The Glengarry was notable for having a very long lifespan for a steamer, being broken up after 83 years of service. It was operated by David MacBrayne Ltd, a forerunner of Caledonian MacBrayne.