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TITLE
Lewiston
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_HERITAGEGROUP_031
PLACENAME
Lewiston
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22698
KEYWORDS
villages
Drumnadrochit
trade
Loch Ness
accommodation<br />
Lewiston

Modern Lewiston is situated at the river Coilty, where it was built in 1803. There was an earlier village called Lewiston, which had been built by Sir James Grant in 1767, however water problems meant that the inhabitants had to be relocated. By the beginning of the 19th century it had approximately 30 houses as well as a school and a smiddy.

The original village had been especially built for ironworkers and artisans. Whilst the new village changed its site, the basic purpose remained the same. Glenurquhart did not undergo the same persecution as other areas of Scotland in the years of the 'highland clearances' because it had developed an economy based on crafting and manufacture, rather than upon farming.

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Lewiston

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

villages; Drumnadrochit; trade; Loch Ness; accommodation<br />

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (photographs)

Modern Lewiston is situated at the river Coilty, where it was built in 1803. There was an earlier village called Lewiston, which had been built by Sir James Grant in 1767, however water problems meant that the inhabitants had to be relocated. By the beginning of the 19th century it had approximately 30 houses as well as a school and a smiddy. <br /> <br /> The original village had been especially built for ironworkers and artisans. Whilst the new village changed its site, the basic purpose remained the same. Glenurquhart did not undergo the same persecution as other areas of Scotland in the years of the 'highland clearances' because it had developed an economy based on crafting and manufacture, rather than upon farming.