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TITLE
Milton from West Glenurquhart
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_HERITAGEGROUP_034
PLACENAME
Milton
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22701
KEYWORDS
roads, mills, factories, factory, weaver, bobbins, wool, manufacturers, processing, technology, oats, oatmeal
Milton from West Glenurquhart

Milton, which is a part of Glenurquhart, is depicted in this photograph. The remains of a chambered cairn have been discovered just above this spot, which demonstrates that it must have been inhabited for a long time.

In the foreground is Carrachan which contained the meal mill (seen beside the poplars). This was the original focal point for Milton and produced valuable food. Further down the road is the lower part of Milton village was called Baile Na Mhuilinn. This area was dominated by the Bobbin mill, which produced the famous Glenurquhart tweed.

These buildings have had a symbiotic relationship with Glenurquhart. They were operated and maintained by the people, but without them the people may have been dispossessed. They were constructed in the late 19th Century under Sir James Grant, Earl of Seafield. This was partially because he foresaw the difficulties of the new economic system brought about by the collapse of feudalism. As the population of Scotland became more urbanised, growing food to be sold to urban areas became a priority and the old system of peasants owning small plots of land was replaced with large sheep farms.

James Grant helped to develop Glenurquhart as an area of manufacturing as much as crofting. Milton was largely sustained by its six mills, which processed meal as well as wool. For a brief time there was a flax mill, though this was not successful.

This photograph shows Milton, from Glenurquhart. During the Edwardian era, civic planning became of increased importance. The large poplars do not commonly grow as a native species in this part of Scotland, but were often cultivated.

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Milton from West Glenurquhart

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

roads, mills, factories, factory, weaver, bobbins, wool, manufacturers, processing, technology, oats, oatmeal

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (photographs)

Milton, which is a part of Glenurquhart, is depicted in this photograph. The remains of a chambered cairn have been discovered just above this spot, which demonstrates that it must have been inhabited for a long time.<br /> <br /> In the foreground is Carrachan which contained the meal mill (seen beside the poplars). This was the original focal point for Milton and produced valuable food. Further down the road is the lower part of Milton village was called Baile Na Mhuilinn. This area was dominated by the Bobbin mill, which produced the famous Glenurquhart tweed. <br /> <br /> These buildings have had a symbiotic relationship with Glenurquhart. They were operated and maintained by the people, but without them the people may have been dispossessed. They were constructed in the late 19th Century under Sir James Grant, Earl of Seafield. This was partially because he foresaw the difficulties of the new economic system brought about by the collapse of feudalism. As the population of Scotland became more urbanised, growing food to be sold to urban areas became a priority and the old system of peasants owning small plots of land was replaced with large sheep farms. <br /> <br /> James Grant helped to develop Glenurquhart as an area of manufacturing as much as crofting. Milton was largely sustained by its six mills, which processed meal as well as wool. For a brief time there was a flax mill, though this was not successful. <br /> <br /> This photograph shows Milton, from Glenurquhart. During the Edwardian era, civic planning became of increased importance. The large poplars do not commonly grow as a native species in this part of Scotland, but were often cultivated.