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TITLE
Lewiston from Borlum Bridge
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_HERITAGEGROUP_036
PLACENAME
Lewiston
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22703
KEYWORDS
houses
bridge
Drumnadrochit
Loch Ness
trees<br />
Lewiston from Borlum Bridge

Glenurquhart was built on the shore of Loch Ness, partially because it was a plane near farm land. This photograph was taken in an area called Borlum (one of the fertile hills) and shows the manufacturing village of Lewiston. Lewiston was predominantly a manufacturing town, whilst Borlum has traditionally been a site in Glenurquhart for breeding horses.

At one time the hills above the town would have been inhabited by crofters.

Lewiston was largely created by Sir James Grant, who named it after his son in 1767. It was created because he foresaw the difficulties of the new economic system brought about by the collapse of feudalism. As the population of Scotland became more centralised, growing food to be sold to urban areas became a priority, and so the old system of peasants owning small plots of land was dissolved to make large sheep farms.

Sir James Grant helped to develop Glenurquhart as an area of manufacturing as much as crofting. Milton was largely sustained by its six mills. Perhaps Glenurquhart was not the most suited to the new system of farming because of the dense heather and mountainous topography, which would reduce the area in which sheep could graze. He was known as 'Good Sir James' because of his foresight and generosity.

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Lewiston from Borlum Bridge

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

houses; bridge; Drumnadrochit; Loch Ness; trees<br />

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (photographs)

Glenurquhart was built on the shore of Loch Ness, partially because it was a plane near farm land. This photograph was taken in an area called Borlum (one of the fertile hills) and shows the manufacturing village of Lewiston. Lewiston was predominantly a manufacturing town, whilst Borlum has traditionally been a site in Glenurquhart for breeding horses. <br /> <br /> At one time the hills above the town would have been inhabited by crofters. <br /> <br /> Lewiston was largely created by Sir James Grant, who named it after his son in 1767. It was created because he foresaw the difficulties of the new economic system brought about by the collapse of feudalism. As the population of Scotland became more centralised, growing food to be sold to urban areas became a priority, and so the old system of peasants owning small plots of land was dissolved to make large sheep farms. <br /> <br /> Sir James Grant helped to develop Glenurquhart as an area of manufacturing as much as crofting. Milton was largely sustained by its six mills. Perhaps Glenurquhart was not the most suited to the new system of farming because of the dense heather and mountainous topography, which would reduce the area in which sheep could graze. He was known as 'Good Sir James' because of his foresight and generosity.