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TITLE
North-East Scotland in the 19th Century
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_JANBELL_MAPS_002
DATE OF IMAGE
1832
PERIOD
1830s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22721
KEYWORDS
tourism
travelling
arboreal
spelling
zoomable images

As travelling became more common and trade created a new drive to connect different Highland communities, maps also changed. This map includes the towns of Lochend and Abriachan. In the 1830s these would be numerically insignificant communities. However, they were sited on important travelling routes. Before the Caledonian Canal allowed ships to leave from Inverness, Lochend would be the easternmost point for ships travelling down the Loch. Abriachan was the major root for land travel. Whilst this path necessitated walking up a steep path, the shore beside the Loch was densely covered with birch trees.

Whilst maps became more practical for travellers by including important travelling destinations they also developed more complex ways to depict terrain. Unlike the 17th Century map, the mountains are portrayed by converging lines rather than by literal drawings. This indicates 'relief', or altitude. Contour lines had not been developed at this time but it can be seen that height is indicated by the density of the lines. The trees on the shores of Loch Ness are not drawn purely for decorative reasons but are illustrated because travel was made difficult by the dense birch forests.

As well as depicting the surrounding geography, the landmarks given prominence in the map are also significant and suggest that it was designed for travellers. Urquhart Castle (then, as now, a ruin) are labelled and so is St. Ninian's Kirk. However, the industrial centres of Milton and Lewiston are not. Both of the inns are given prominence. It is notable that one inn is on an area of raised land. This is the 'ridge' which contributed to Drumnadrochit's name 'Bridge on the Ridge'. Accommodation for travellers has long been built on this site both because it is on the outskirts of town and it provides a good view of the area. It later became the site of the Drumnadrochit Hotel but now the Glenurquhart Visitor Centre has taken over this building.

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North-East Scotland in the 19th Century

1830s

tourism; travelling; arboreal; spelling; zoomable images

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

As travelling became more common and trade created a new drive to connect different Highland communities, maps also changed. This map includes the towns of Lochend and Abriachan. In the 1830s these would be numerically insignificant communities. However, they were sited on important travelling routes. Before the Caledonian Canal allowed ships to leave from Inverness, Lochend would be the easternmost point for ships travelling down the Loch. Abriachan was the major root for land travel. Whilst this path necessitated walking up a steep path, the shore beside the Loch was densely covered with birch trees. <br /> <br /> Whilst maps became more practical for travellers by including important travelling destinations they also developed more complex ways to depict terrain. Unlike the 17th Century map, the mountains are portrayed by converging lines rather than by literal drawings. This indicates 'relief', or altitude. Contour lines had not been developed at this time but it can be seen that height is indicated by the density of the lines. The trees on the shores of Loch Ness are not drawn purely for decorative reasons but are illustrated because travel was made difficult by the dense birch forests.<br /> <br /> As well as depicting the surrounding geography, the landmarks given prominence in the map are also significant and suggest that it was designed for travellers. Urquhart Castle (then, as now, a ruin) are labelled and so is St. Ninian's Kirk. However, the industrial centres of Milton and Lewiston are not. Both of the inns are given prominence. It is notable that one inn is on an area of raised land. This is the 'ridge' which contributed to Drumnadrochit's name 'Bridge on the Ridge'. Accommodation for travellers has long been built on this site both because it is on the outskirts of town and it provides a good view of the area. It later became the site of the Drumnadrochit Hotel but now the Glenurquhart Visitor Centre has taken over this building.