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TITLE
The Effects of the Caledonian Canal on Glenurquhart
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_JANBELL_MAPS_003_001
PLACENAME
Glenurquhart
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1846
PERIOD
1840s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22722
KEYWORDS
irrigation
Telford
engineering
flooding
weir
zoomable

Perhaps the most dramatic human construction in Glenurquhart is the Caledonian Canal. This was a very ambitious project to connect the numerous bodies of water along the Great Glen and use them as a route for shipping.

One problem with this idea was that the project caused significant flooding in the area. All three main Lochs which were integrated into the canal were significantly different in altitude. When the Caledonian Canal reached Loch Dochfour, the level of Loch Ness extended between 9 and 10 metres.

This was a significant problem for Glen Urquhart. The area was first inhabited because the low plane beneath a mountain river provided a flat and level area in an otherwise rocky and uneven landscape. When the Caledonian Canal was built the combination of water and flat earth meant that the area faced problems with flooding. The purpose of this map was to discover the precise effects of the floods. Whilst the note mentions that the colours blue and green are used to demonstrate the increase in water levels the ink has faded and is now indistinguishable.

The Caledonian Canal was a project commissioned by the British Government and the design of the map demonstrates that the Scottish Highlands were strongly integrated into the rest of Britain. It is illustrated by the text on this map that English spelling was almost entirely standardised by the 1840s and was used instead of Gaelic in official documents. Almost the entire text is identical to how it would be written today. The main difference is the standardisation of Gaelic words. For example, the river Coiltie is spelt 'Kyltie' here.

The use of English language is significant because the map depicts the lands of the Earl of Seafield. This hereditary office existed since the medieval times and was filled by the Grant family. The Grant clan were strongly pro-Hanoverian during the Jacobite uprising and the use of English demonstrates that they were largely anglicised.

From the map, it can be seen that an area close to the Loch is called Land of St Ninian's. St Ninian was a Celtic Saint who is said to have preached in the area in the 4th Century AD. A church was built upon this site.

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The Effects of the Caledonian Canal on Glenurquhart

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1840s

irrigation; Telford; engineering; flooding; weir; zoomable

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

Perhaps the most dramatic human construction in Glenurquhart is the Caledonian Canal. This was a very ambitious project to connect the numerous bodies of water along the Great Glen and use them as a route for shipping. <br /> <br /> One problem with this idea was that the project caused significant flooding in the area. All three main Lochs which were integrated into the canal were significantly different in altitude. When the Caledonian Canal reached Loch Dochfour, the level of Loch Ness extended between 9 and 10 metres. <br /> <br /> This was a significant problem for Glen Urquhart. The area was first inhabited because the low plane beneath a mountain river provided a flat and level area in an otherwise rocky and uneven landscape. When the Caledonian Canal was built the combination of water and flat earth meant that the area faced problems with flooding. The purpose of this map was to discover the precise effects of the floods. Whilst the note mentions that the colours blue and green are used to demonstrate the increase in water levels the ink has faded and is now indistinguishable.<br /> <br /> The Caledonian Canal was a project commissioned by the British Government and the design of the map demonstrates that the Scottish Highlands were strongly integrated into the rest of Britain. It is illustrated by the text on this map that English spelling was almost entirely standardised by the 1840s and was used instead of Gaelic in official documents. Almost the entire text is identical to how it would be written today. The main difference is the standardisation of Gaelic words. For example, the river Coiltie is spelt 'Kyltie' here. <br /> <br /> The use of English language is significant because the map depicts the lands of the Earl of Seafield. This hereditary office existed since the medieval times and was filled by the Grant family. The Grant clan were strongly pro-Hanoverian during the Jacobite uprising and the use of English demonstrates that they were largely anglicised.<br /> <br /> From the map, it can be seen that an area close to the Loch is called Land of St Ninian's. St Ninian was a Celtic Saint who is said to have preached in the area in the 4th Century AD. A church was built upon this site.