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TITLE
Effects of the Caledonian Canal on Glenurquhart
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_JANBELL_MAPS_003_003
PLACENAME
Glenurquhart
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1801
PERIOD
1810s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22724
KEYWORDS
botany
herbs
geological
farm
farms
agrarian
zoomable

Agriculture changed greatly in the early 19th Century and this map of Glenurquhart in 1801 demonstrates how cartography adapted to emphasise properties of the soil. There is a greater use of symbol to depict the type of geology and vegetation in different areas of Glenurquhart.

It is notable that a caption describes 'improvable ground'. In previous decades, it would be very difficult to improve ground. In the early 19th Century, two main advances permitted land to be improved. The first was that agricultural implements were decreased in size and weight. This meant that more land could be ploughed and developed. Secondly, it had been discovered that crop rotation could maximise the use of soil. Certain plants possess bacteria which can draw nutrients from the soil. If another plant is grown in the same place, then it will benefit from the previous crop. The Earl of Seafield, 'good' Sir James Grant introduced the concept of crop rotation to Glen Urquhart.

Whilst this map shows the many benefits of new innovations to the Highlands there are also some less positive aspects. One thing that is noticeable about the map is that cairns are highlighted and their removal is recommended. Cairns are man-made stacks of rocks. They date far back into Scottish history (a chambered cairn from 3000 BC has been found in Corriemony) and are usually built to mark a grave. That they came to be regarded as a hindrance to soil cultivation is an indication of the social change at the time and the damage to tradition.

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Effects of the Caledonian Canal on Glenurquhart

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1810s

botany; herbs; geological; farm; farms; agrarian;; zoomable

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

Agriculture changed greatly in the early 19th Century and this map of Glenurquhart in 1801 demonstrates how cartography adapted to emphasise properties of the soil. There is a greater use of symbol to depict the type of geology and vegetation in different areas of Glenurquhart.<br /> <br /> It is notable that a caption describes 'improvable ground'. In previous decades, it would be very difficult to improve ground. In the early 19th Century, two main advances permitted land to be improved. The first was that agricultural implements were decreased in size and weight. This meant that more land could be ploughed and developed. Secondly, it had been discovered that crop rotation could maximise the use of soil. Certain plants possess bacteria which can draw nutrients from the soil. If another plant is grown in the same place, then it will benefit from the previous crop. The Earl of Seafield, 'good' Sir James Grant introduced the concept of crop rotation to Glen Urquhart.<br /> <br /> Whilst this map shows the many benefits of new innovations to the Highlands there are also some less positive aspects. One thing that is noticeable about the map is that cairns are highlighted and their removal is recommended. Cairns are man-made stacks of rocks. They date far back into Scottish history (a chambered cairn from 3000 BC has been found in Corriemony) and are usually built to mark a grave. That they came to be regarded as a hindrance to soil cultivation is an indication of the social change at the time and the damage to tradition.