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TITLE
Glen Albyn
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_JANBELL_MAPS_004_002
PLACENAME
Urquhart Bay
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1873
PERIOD
1870s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22727
KEYWORDS
mountain
religious history
land appropriation
value
agricultural economy
zoomable images

The style of this map is similar to the previous one. It is interesting that the bay of Glenurquhart is illustrated with concentric lines to indicate that the water progressively deepens as it recedes from the shore. This is curious as the map gives little indication of altitude of the hills surrounding Glenurquhart. This indicates that the area was more prized for its waterways than as a route of land travel.

Another curious feature of the map is that the pine forest on Creag Nay is indicated by one type of symbol whilst the deciduous trees beneath are given different symbols. This is interesting because there are no symbols used to differentiate the cultivated vegetation. This demonstrates that there was little interest in the area as a resource for produce for the map-surveyors.

As well as leaving the crops unlabelled, the map does not mark any significant buildings in Drumnadrochit. It also indicates that the town was originally built at a considerable distance from the Loch. The plane beside the Loch now has been significantly developed though at the time there would have been more cultivated land at this point. However, there are few significant man-made landmarks on the map.

It is interesting that one of the few human landmarks is the 'Supposed Site of the Knights Templar's Chapel'. This tradition is not written about much and may be a legend. The Knights Templar quarrelled with the Vatican in the 14th Century. Many of them were massacred by the order of the French King (not the Pope as has often been stated). In Scotland the Knights Templar have a semi-mythical status. The victory of the Scots over the English at Bannockburn has been attributed to the Knights Templar.

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Glen Albyn

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1870s

mountain; religious history; land appropriation; value; agricultural economy; zoomable images

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

The style of this map is similar to the previous one. It is interesting that the bay of Glenurquhart is illustrated with concentric lines to indicate that the water progressively deepens as it recedes from the shore. This is curious as the map gives little indication of altitude of the hills surrounding Glenurquhart. This indicates that the area was more prized for its waterways than as a route of land travel. <br /> <br /> Another curious feature of the map is that the pine forest on Creag Nay is indicated by one type of symbol whilst the deciduous trees beneath are given different symbols. This is interesting because there are no symbols used to differentiate the cultivated vegetation. This demonstrates that there was little interest in the area as a resource for produce for the map-surveyors. <br /> <br /> As well as leaving the crops unlabelled, the map does not mark any significant buildings in Drumnadrochit. It also indicates that the town was originally built at a considerable distance from the Loch. The plane beside the Loch now has been significantly developed though at the time there would have been more cultivated land at this point. However, there are few significant man-made landmarks on the map. <br /> <br /> It is interesting that one of the few human landmarks is the 'Supposed Site of the Knights Templar's Chapel'. This tradition is not written about much and may be a legend. The Knights Templar quarrelled with the Vatican in the 14th Century. Many of them were massacred by the order of the French King (not the Pope as has often been stated). In Scotland the Knights Templar have a semi-mythical status. The victory of the Scots over the English at Bannockburn has been attributed to the Knights Templar.