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TITLE
Glenurquhart Map
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_JANBELL_MAPS_004_005
PLACENAME
Glenurquhart
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1873
PERIOD
1870s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22730
KEYWORDS
topography
height
zoomable images

In style this page seems to be part of the same greater map from which the previous four photographs were taken. If this were the case then a cartographer of the 1870s would not have included any significant information concerning land use or important buildings in the area.

The surveillance work is mainly attributed to army officers. This could be because the military developed the area's infrastructure. The feudal system of land ownership meant that there was little impetus for land development. Increased quantities of livestock, especially sheep, meant that there was little economic incentive for land owners to develop roads or water-ways. The technological advances of the 19th Century had little application for the rural economy so the government introduced the benefits of the industrial revolution to rural areas.

Because the government surveyed the area and provided the waterways the map has been standardised to conform to British empiricism. This can be shown because the altitude is measured from sea-level in Liverpool. Scotland and England had become so integrated by the late 19th Century and that a common system for determining sea-level had been standardised by the 1870s.

Whilst the map itself demonstrates the unity between Scotland and England, some features also demonstrate rifts within Scottish society. An interesting feature of this map is that it depicts a Free Church School. This demonstrates how rapidly the effects of the disruption spread throughout Scotland. Because the Church of Scotland provided education up until the Education Act, this had a direct impact on teaching.

Divach Lodge is also illustrated. This place hosted many famous people including Anthony Trollope and Henry Irving.

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Glenurquhart Map

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1870s

topography; height;; zoomable images

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

In style this page seems to be part of the same greater map from which the previous four photographs were taken. If this were the case then a cartographer of the 1870s would not have included any significant information concerning land use or important buildings in the area.<br /> <br /> The surveillance work is mainly attributed to army officers. This could be because the military developed the area's infrastructure. The feudal system of land ownership meant that there was little impetus for land development. Increased quantities of livestock, especially sheep, meant that there was little economic incentive for land owners to develop roads or water-ways. The technological advances of the 19th Century had little application for the rural economy so the government introduced the benefits of the industrial revolution to rural areas. <br /> <br /> Because the government surveyed the area and provided the waterways the map has been standardised to conform to British empiricism. This can be shown because the altitude is measured from sea-level in Liverpool. Scotland and England had become so integrated by the late 19th Century and that a common system for determining sea-level had been standardised by the 1870s. <br /> <br /> Whilst the map itself demonstrates the unity between Scotland and England, some features also demonstrate rifts within Scottish society. An interesting feature of this map is that it depicts a Free Church School. This demonstrates how rapidly the effects of the disruption spread throughout Scotland. Because the Church of Scotland provided education up until the Education Act, this had a direct impact on teaching.<br /> <br /> Divach Lodge is also illustrated. This place hosted many famous people including Anthony Trollope and Henry Irving.