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TITLE
River Enrick
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_JANBELL_MAPS_004_006
PLACENAME
River Enrick
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1873
PERIOD
1870s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22731
KEYWORDS
irrigation
springs
industrial revolution
zoomable images

This map is focussed upon the river Enrick. It is because there has always been a bridge over the Enrick that the town has become known as 'Drumnadrochit', bridge on the ridge.

Whilst the area of the bridge became the centre of habitation, a new town was built higher up the Enrick and called Milton. This was largely a response to the changing economy during the 18th Century. The crofting system had come to an end and been replaced with a system of large sheep farms. Because small farms no longer provided a stable economy, the laird 'good' Sir James Grant created a manufacturing base for the Glenurquhart economy. This resulted in Millton.

It is interesting that the map uses the spelling of 'Millton'. Standardised spelling in England and Scotland gradually became identical. It is also notable that it is an English phrase. As Milton was developed by Sir James Grant it demonstrates that the aristocracy had become largely anglicised by this time.

By contrast, the countryside around Drumnadrochit shows a marked increase in Gaelic place names. One interesting departure from the proliferation of Gaelic is that a waterfall is marked in English. This could indicate that the map was designed for tourists from England or English speaking parts of Scotland and this is why the landmarks and developed areas tend to use this language.

By contrast, Gaelic names become increasingly common in the vast areas of uncultivated land surrounding Drumnadrochit. The map attempts to depict the mountainous terrain by using small illustrations of mountains combined with numbers (indicating imperial height from Liverpool sea-level). This suggests that contour lines had not come into general use when the map was engraved.

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River Enrick

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1870s

irrigation; springs; industrial revolution; zoomable images

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

This map is focussed upon the river Enrick. It is because there has always been a bridge over the Enrick that the town has become known as 'Drumnadrochit', bridge on the ridge. <br /> <br /> Whilst the area of the bridge became the centre of habitation, a new town was built higher up the Enrick and called Milton. This was largely a response to the changing economy during the 18th Century. The crofting system had come to an end and been replaced with a system of large sheep farms. Because small farms no longer provided a stable economy, the laird 'good' Sir James Grant created a manufacturing base for the Glenurquhart economy. This resulted in Millton. <br /> <br /> It is interesting that the map uses the spelling of 'Millton'. Standardised spelling in England and Scotland gradually became identical. It is also notable that it is an English phrase. As Milton was developed by Sir James Grant it demonstrates that the aristocracy had become largely anglicised by this time.<br /> <br /> By contrast, the countryside around Drumnadrochit shows a marked increase in Gaelic place names. One interesting departure from the proliferation of Gaelic is that a waterfall is marked in English. This could indicate that the map was designed for tourists from England or English speaking parts of Scotland and this is why the landmarks and developed areas tend to use this language. <br /> <br /> By contrast, Gaelic names become increasingly common in the vast areas of uncultivated land surrounding Drumnadrochit. The map attempts to depict the mountainous terrain by using small illustrations of mountains combined with numbers (indicating imperial height from Liverpool sea-level). This suggests that contour lines had not come into general use when the map was engraved.