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TITLE
Kiltarlity and Convinth
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_JANBELL_MAPS_004_008
PLACENAME
Kiltarlity and Convinth
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kiltarlity and Convinth
DATE OF IMAGE
1874
PERIOD
1840s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22733
KEYWORDS
cultivation
land development
mountain
Highland topography
zoomable images

It can be seen that this map was printed before the construction of Blairbeg hall. However the local school in cul an Loan had been built by the time. When the map was created this school would have been one of many in the area and would have provided basic education for children. By 1893 it had become the focus for schooling throughout the Glen.

Whilst this map seems to be the same as the previous one, it includes the land above the town of Glenurquhart. This demonstrates why the low Glen was of such great value. There was such a quantity of surrounding land which could not be cultivated. This seems very large compared to the town itself.

Several wells are highlighted in this map which indicates that these were still of great importance at the time despite the vast amount of surrounding water. Wells have long been mentioned in Celtic myths and miracle stories. This includes Abbot Adomnan's account of St Columba, where the Saint is said to have blessed a previously toxic well, which became a pure source of water. Wells have long been important in folklore which indicates their vitality to the people of rural Scotland.

Another interesting feature of this map is the ice house. As with many 19th Century innovations this is given an English title. An ice-house was the predecessor of the modern freezer and was a place where food was kept chilled to kill bacteria and maggots. What it most curious is that it is far from the town centre. This suggests that it belonged to the estate and was used for game. The crofters would probably not have any perishable food to keep as they shared what little produce they had - or salted or smoked it.

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Kiltarlity and Convinth

INVERNESS: Kiltarlity and Convinth

1840s

cultivation; land development; mountain; Highland topography; zoomable images

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

It can be seen that this map was printed before the construction of Blairbeg hall. However the local school in cul an Loan had been built by the time. When the map was created this school would have been one of many in the area and would have provided basic education for children. By 1893 it had become the focus for schooling throughout the Glen.<br /> <br /> Whilst this map seems to be the same as the previous one, it includes the land above the town of Glenurquhart. This demonstrates why the low Glen was of such great value. There was such a quantity of surrounding land which could not be cultivated. This seems very large compared to the town itself.<br /> <br /> Several wells are highlighted in this map which indicates that these were still of great importance at the time despite the vast amount of surrounding water. Wells have long been mentioned in Celtic myths and miracle stories. This includes Abbot Adomnan's account of St Columba, where the Saint is said to have blessed a previously toxic well, which became a pure source of water. Wells have long been important in folklore which indicates their vitality to the people of rural Scotland.<br /> <br /> Another interesting feature of this map is the ice house. As with many 19th Century innovations this is given an English title. An ice-house was the predecessor of the modern freezer and was a place where food was kept chilled to kill bacteria and maggots. What it most curious is that it is far from the town centre. This suggests that it belonged to the estate and was used for game. The crofters would probably not have any perishable food to keep as they shared what little produce they had - or salted or smoked it.