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TITLE
Loch Meiklie
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_JANBELL_MAPS_005_001
PLACENAME
Loch Meiklie
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1874
PERIOD
1870s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22734
KEYWORDS
linguistics
language development
Episcopalian
rectory
hunt
game
zoomable images

In the late 19th Century, there was an increasing trend for the aristocracy to participate in outdoor activities. The impact of this on Glenurquhart can be seen from this map which shows a building called Lakefield House in the middle of the forest. This is an interesting name because it is a composite of two English words whilst almost all of the surrounding landmarks possess Gaelic names. By this time the Scottish aristocracy were largely anglicised.

Near Lakefield House there is a Parsonage. 'Manse' is the usual designation for the accommodation of a Church of Scotland minister. The word 'Parsonage' is more commonly used for clergy of the Anglican or Episcopal Church. This indicates that the tenant of Lakefield House most probably had English roots.

There is also a summer house and kennels on the opposite bank. In the 19th Century, the Highlands had become popular with the aristocracy who went hunting and fishing in the area. Glenurquhart even produced a breed of dog which was a cross between a deer-hound and a collie. However, with the invention of guns, large hunting dogs became less important in game hunting.

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Loch Meiklie

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1870s

linguistics; language development; Episcopalian; rectory; hunt; game; zoomable images

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

In the late 19th Century, there was an increasing trend for the aristocracy to participate in outdoor activities. The impact of this on Glenurquhart can be seen from this map which shows a building called Lakefield House in the middle of the forest. This is an interesting name because it is a composite of two English words whilst almost all of the surrounding landmarks possess Gaelic names. By this time the Scottish aristocracy were largely anglicised. <br /> <br /> Near Lakefield House there is a Parsonage. 'Manse' is the usual designation for the accommodation of a Church of Scotland minister. The word 'Parsonage' is more commonly used for clergy of the Anglican or Episcopal Church. This indicates that the tenant of Lakefield House most probably had English roots. <br /> <br /> There is also a summer house and kennels on the opposite bank. In the 19th Century, the Highlands had become popular with the aristocracy who went hunting and fishing in the area. Glenurquhart even produced a breed of dog which was a cross between a deer-hound and a collie. However, with the invention of guns, large hunting dogs became less important in game hunting.