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TITLE
Inchbrine Estate 1808
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_JANBELL_MAPS_006_001
PLACENAME
Inchbrine Estate
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1808
PERIOD
1800s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22742
KEYWORDS
Corriemony
Loch Gart
farming
land ownership
farming
zoomable images

Dating from the early 19th Century, this is a map of the Western side of the Inchbrine estate, which is bordered by the neighbouring estates of Corriemony and Eskadale. On the border with the Eskadale Estate there is a marsh 'claimed by Sir James Grant'. This demonstrates that the early 19th Century was a materialistic time.

Whilst the people who would be speculating about the land would probably be aristocratic, there is a lot of informality. For example it describes one area as 'Pretty good pasture'. This could be said to demonstrate the way in which the Scottish aristocracy had become anglicised, and also the way in which the feudal capitalist system had created a culture where land and natural resources were crudely assessed for their economic value. Previously the feudal landowners would have seen the land as clan property. By the time of this map it was a resource which could be divided between pasture and arable land (arable farmland is used for growing crops, whilst pasture is for feeding animals). Even a small rocky hill called Knock Grishach has been assessed for its capacity to feed sheep. An area is described as 'moor ground, short heath, pretty good pasture'. It is evident now that this is not an ideal place for grazing animals, as heather is inedible to most animals and contains a lot of harmful parasites. However, sheep farms had become the standard way of landowners getting rich.

By this time, the economy had become so dependent upon sheep that even areas which would be very poor for nourishing them (and be difficult to cultivate) were included on the maps as 'pasture'. After the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion, sheep farming had become the major source of income for many of the Scottish aristocratic families.

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Inchbrine Estate 1808

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1800s

Corriemony; Loch Gart; farming; land ownership; farming; zoomable images

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

Dating from the early 19th Century, this is a map of the Western side of the Inchbrine estate, which is bordered by the neighbouring estates of Corriemony and Eskadale. On the border with the Eskadale Estate there is a marsh 'claimed by Sir James Grant'. This demonstrates that the early 19th Century was a materialistic time. <br /> <br /> Whilst the people who would be speculating about the land would probably be aristocratic, there is a lot of informality. For example it describes one area as 'Pretty good pasture'. This could be said to demonstrate the way in which the Scottish aristocracy had become anglicised, and also the way in which the feudal capitalist system had created a culture where land and natural resources were crudely assessed for their economic value. Previously the feudal landowners would have seen the land as clan property. By the time of this map it was a resource which could be divided between pasture and arable land (arable farmland is used for growing crops, whilst pasture is for feeding animals). Even a small rocky hill called Knock Grishach has been assessed for its capacity to feed sheep. An area is described as 'moor ground, short heath, pretty good pasture'. It is evident now that this is not an ideal place for grazing animals, as heather is inedible to most animals and contains a lot of harmful parasites. However, sheep farms had become the standard way of landowners getting rich. <br /> <br /> By this time, the economy had become so dependent upon sheep that even areas which would be very poor for nourishing them (and be difficult to cultivate) were included on the maps as 'pasture'. After the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion, sheep farming had become the major source of income for many of the Scottish aristocratic families.