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TITLE
Inchbrine Estate
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_JANBELL_MAPS_006_002
PLACENAME
Inchbrine Estate
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1808
PERIOD
1800s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22743
KEYWORDS
Davoch
zoomable images

When it was surveyed, Inchbrine Estate was apparently spelt differently as Inchbreen. There are no habitations on this map and the main landmarks are Loch Gart and a rock called Craggan Rie Na Scurrie. There is also a substantial moor called Craig Na Gour More. It can be seen that this map was surveyed by someone named George Brown. This would appear to be either an English or a Lowland name and indicates the way in which the Highlands were divided up by the Clan chieftains, using Anglicised methods. One place is described as 'disputed march', and this indicates how intense the struggle for land ownership had become, because even marshes were being fought over.

This competitive and materialistic approach to the land ownership is also very noticeable from the sentence that Cairn More (or big cairn) was also disputed but claimed by Sir James Grant. A cairn is usually the site of a burial place, and 'Cairn More' means place of the big cairn, which indicates that it was once a place of great sentimental importance. Yet in the era of the clearances, ancient monuments and places which had played an important role in Scottish culture through the centuries were just viewed as more land for cultivating.

In later years the area would become of cultural significance because of Divach Lodge. Many famous people invcluding the children's writer JM Barrie and the actress Ellen Terry visited this guest house.

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Inchbrine Estate

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1800s

Davoch; zoomable images

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

When it was surveyed, Inchbrine Estate was apparently spelt differently as Inchbreen. There are no habitations on this map and the main landmarks are Loch Gart and a rock called Craggan Rie Na Scurrie. There is also a substantial moor called Craig Na Gour More. It can be seen that this map was surveyed by someone named George Brown. This would appear to be either an English or a Lowland name and indicates the way in which the Highlands were divided up by the Clan chieftains, using Anglicised methods. One place is described as 'disputed march', and this indicates how intense the struggle for land ownership had become, because even marshes were being fought over. <br /> <br /> This competitive and materialistic approach to the land ownership is also very noticeable from the sentence that Cairn More (or big cairn) was also disputed but claimed by Sir James Grant. A cairn is usually the site of a burial place, and 'Cairn More' means place of the big cairn, which indicates that it was once a place of great sentimental importance. Yet in the era of the clearances, ancient monuments and places which had played an important role in Scottish culture through the centuries were just viewed as more land for cultivating.<br /> <br /> In later years the area would become of cultural significance because of Divach Lodge. Many famous people invcluding the children's writer JM Barrie and the actress Ellen Terry visited this guest house.