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TITLE
Clunemore, Borlum
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_JANBELL_MAPS_007_001
PLACENAME
Borlum
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1808
PERIOD
1800s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22744
KEYWORDS
Balnalurngie
Clune More
Kinoch
Ballbeg
Balbeg
Allen More
Gorochkin
torran a brecht
zoomable images

Borlum has long been a significant area of Glen Urquhart and this map covers the area from its border with Lochletter, to Loch Meiklie and Balnagleik. Borlum is one of the few Medieval Anglo-Norman place names of Glenurquhart. Despite this, most of the place names within Borlum are Gaelic. This map depicts Borlum in the early 19th Century. One of the main places of interest is a hill called Kinock Auchty. Other significant areas are Balnain and Bal Beg and Bal Na Leik. The Celtic component 'Bal' indicates an enclosed settlement.

Aside from all the Celtic names there is also an area called Upperton which is modern English. The estate of Lochletter borders this one, apparently to the South. Despite the apparent disregard for the Gaelic language, there is an interesting feature to this map, that it includes some Gaelic words in English sentences. For example it says 'Road through the Strath of Urquhart'. By contrast words such as 'knock', 'tor' or 'craig' are rarely translated. This is because they signify steep, rocky ground and would make the land sound less valuable.

One interesting feature of this map is that it demonstrates that Gaelic spelling had not been standardised and the Latin alphabet was used in a fairly haphazard way. This can be seen from the use of the letter 'V' in Gaelic place names, even though the standard Latin transcription for 'V' is usually made from 'BH'.

As with other Glenurquhart maps in this 1808 series, one sometimes finds the language is unpleasant. There is a title 'Rivach wood, pretty good'. The informality of the word 'pretty' and unintentional rhyme give the impression that no one expected this document to possess any cultural value, and that it was only intended as an assessment of Glenurquhart as a place on which animals could be grazed.

Another interesting feature of this map is that there is a 'lime kiln'. This is an instrument for extracting a calcium rich fertiliser from limestone, a sedimentary rock of aquatic origin. This could be a feature of the new farming methods which Good Sir James Grant introduced to maximise soil capacity in Glenurquhart.

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Clunemore, Borlum

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1800s

Balnalurngie; Clune More; Kinoch; Ballbeg; Balbeg; Allen More; Gorochkin; torran a brecht; zoomable images

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

Borlum has long been a significant area of Glen Urquhart and this map covers the area from its border with Lochletter, to Loch Meiklie and Balnagleik. Borlum is one of the few Medieval Anglo-Norman place names of Glenurquhart. Despite this, most of the place names within Borlum are Gaelic. This map depicts Borlum in the early 19th Century. One of the main places of interest is a hill called Kinock Auchty. Other significant areas are Balnain and Bal Beg and Bal Na Leik. The Celtic component 'Bal' indicates an enclosed settlement.<br /> <br /> Aside from all the Celtic names there is also an area called Upperton which is modern English. The estate of Lochletter borders this one, apparently to the South. Despite the apparent disregard for the Gaelic language, there is an interesting feature to this map, that it includes some Gaelic words in English sentences. For example it says 'Road through the Strath of Urquhart'. By contrast words such as 'knock', 'tor' or 'craig' are rarely translated. This is because they signify steep, rocky ground and would make the land sound less valuable. <br /> <br /> One interesting feature of this map is that it demonstrates that Gaelic spelling had not been standardised and the Latin alphabet was used in a fairly haphazard way. This can be seen from the use of the letter 'V' in Gaelic place names, even though the standard Latin transcription for 'V' is usually made from 'BH'. <br /> <br /> As with other Glenurquhart maps in this 1808 series, one sometimes finds the language is unpleasant. There is a title 'Rivach wood, pretty good'. The informality of the word 'pretty' and unintentional rhyme give the impression that no one expected this document to possess any cultural value, and that it was only intended as an assessment of Glenurquhart as a place on which animals could be grazed. <br /> <br /> Another interesting feature of this map is that there is a 'lime kiln'. This is an instrument for extracting a calcium rich fertiliser from limestone, a sedimentary rock of aquatic origin. This could be a feature of the new farming methods which Good Sir James Grant introduced to maximise soil capacity in Glenurquhart.