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TITLE
Clunemore, Borlum
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_JANBELL_MAPS_007_002
PLACENAME
Borlum
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1808
PERIOD
1800s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22745
KEYWORDS
Knock Grishack
Leimenach
Torran a Brech
zoomable images

The 19th Century was the time of the clearances. Whilst Glenurquhart was relatively lucky in this time, due to industrialisation and new methods of farming, the land surrounding Glenurquhart was squeezed to its absolute capacity as a source of pasture. This can be demonstrated by the word 'pasture' inscribed on the land which borders the forest. This map depicts the area of land around Glen Urquhart from the land of St. Ninian's (close to temple pier today) around Urquhart Bay and the Castle. It is bordered by Clunemore and Balmacaan. Many of the place names contain the Gaelic word 'Bal', which means place of. This is the same root as the name 'Baltimore', which came from Irish Gaelic.

As well as many Gaelic names there are also a lot of more recent Anglicised names. For example there is a place called The Red Dale and another called East Dale. Glen is the Celtic word for Dale. It demonstrates that once the Anglicised aristocracy gave names to places of military power (such as the land surrounding the castle) but in the 19th Century it was the economical innovations (of large sheep farms) which brought Anglicised place names to Scotland, because power had come to be defined by money. There is also a Clover Park and Water of Coiltie, which seem as much culturally as linguistically Anglicised. During the mid-19th Century, parks were an important feature of English estates and this fashion seems to have spread to the Highlands.

As with the previous maps made of Glenurquhart at the time to demonstrate farming capacity there is a degree of crudity about the language, which seems full of unintentional rhyme and alliteration. One such caption reads 'steep ground with birch wood and pretty good grass pasture'. This could be seen as representative of the way in which land came to be seen very materialistically. However, this was not always a bad thing. For example some of the land is marked as 'improvable'. It was at this time that Lord James Grant helped Glenurquhart by implementing some of the latest scientific discoveries to maximise crop yield. This involved rotating the crops which were planted. Some crops possessed bacteria which could enrich the soil with certain nutrients (for example nitrogen) and subsequently the next crop could benefit from this.

The land itself is interesting for its features and what they demonstrate about the area's history. In this map the birch trees seem to be the commonest in the area. This was before the forestry commission was set up and planted conifers. The birch trees have grown in abundance since the ice age. In fact the ice age was probably the greatest single force in forming the landscape of the area. Another feature of the ice age is the hill lochs where ice created pools on high ground. The measurements and depths of these lochs are given here.

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Clunemore, Borlum

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1800s

Knock Grishack; Leimenach; Torran a Brech; zoomable images

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

The 19th Century was the time of the clearances. Whilst Glenurquhart was relatively lucky in this time, due to industrialisation and new methods of farming, the land surrounding Glenurquhart was squeezed to its absolute capacity as a source of pasture. This can be demonstrated by the word 'pasture' inscribed on the land which borders the forest. This map depicts the area of land around Glen Urquhart from the land of St. Ninian's (close to temple pier today) around Urquhart Bay and the Castle. It is bordered by Clunemore and Balmacaan. Many of the place names contain the Gaelic word 'Bal', which means place of. This is the same root as the name 'Baltimore', which came from Irish Gaelic. <br /> <br /> As well as many Gaelic names there are also a lot of more recent Anglicised names. For example there is a place called The Red Dale and another called East Dale. Glen is the Celtic word for Dale. It demonstrates that once the Anglicised aristocracy gave names to places of military power (such as the land surrounding the castle) but in the 19th Century it was the economical innovations (of large sheep farms) which brought Anglicised place names to Scotland, because power had come to be defined by money. There is also a Clover Park and Water of Coiltie, which seem as much culturally as linguistically Anglicised. During the mid-19th Century, parks were an important feature of English estates and this fashion seems to have spread to the Highlands. <br /> <br /> As with the previous maps made of Glenurquhart at the time to demonstrate farming capacity there is a degree of crudity about the language, which seems full of unintentional rhyme and alliteration. One such caption reads 'steep ground with birch wood and pretty good grass pasture'. This could be seen as representative of the way in which land came to be seen very materialistically. However, this was not always a bad thing. For example some of the land is marked as 'improvable'. It was at this time that Lord James Grant helped Glenurquhart by implementing some of the latest scientific discoveries to maximise crop yield. This involved rotating the crops which were planted. Some crops possessed bacteria which could enrich the soil with certain nutrients (for example nitrogen) and subsequently the next crop could benefit from this.<br /> <br /> The land itself is interesting for its features and what they demonstrate about the area's history. In this map the birch trees seem to be the commonest in the area. This was before the forestry commission was set up and planted conifers. The birch trees have grown in abundance since the ice age. In fact the ice age was probably the greatest single force in forming the landscape of the area. Another feature of the ice age is the hill lochs where ice created pools on high ground. The measurements and depths of these lochs are given here.