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TITLE
Clunemore, Borlum, 1808
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_JANBELL_MAPS_007_003
PLACENAME
Borlum
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1808
PERIOD
1800s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22746
KEYWORDS
Touran a Baile
Clachnachanie
lon an ac hrain
zoomable images

This map depicts land near Clunemore, in Borlum which borders Divach, with a footpath to Glenmoriston leading westwards. As with most Glenurquhart maps at the time, its main function is to describe the areas of land which can be used for grazing sheep. It can be seen that even birch woods were used for sheep pasture. This demonstrates how significant sheep were to the 19th Century Scottish economy. The land is obviously not ideal for sheep farming because it is marshy and contains a lot of moor land and mossy ground. The buildings themselves are given very little detail and settlements are known by Gaelic names, such as Fouran A Baile. This indicates that Anglicised newcomers had not colonised the region.

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Clunemore, Borlum, 1808

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1800s

Touran a Baile; Clachnachanie; lon an ac hrain; zoomable images

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

This map depicts land near Clunemore, in Borlum which borders Divach, with a footpath to Glenmoriston leading westwards. As with most Glenurquhart maps at the time, its main function is to describe the areas of land which can be used for grazing sheep. It can be seen that even birch woods were used for sheep pasture. This demonstrates how significant sheep were to the 19th Century Scottish economy. The land is obviously not ideal for sheep farming because it is marshy and contains a lot of moor land and mossy ground. The buildings themselves are given very little detail and settlements are known by Gaelic names, such as Fouran A Baile. This indicates that Anglicised newcomers had not colonised the region.