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TITLE
Loch Meikle
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GLENURQUHART_JANBELL_MAPS_008_001
PLACENAME
Loch Meikle
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1904
PERIOD
1900s
SOURCE
Glenurquhart Heritage Group
ASSET ID
22747
KEYWORDS
Strath Marsley
Corriemony House
Coire Beag
Kyleachorkty Lodge
Breckry Wood
Druim Fada
zoomable images

It can be seen by this map of Glenurquhart that cartography of the Scottish Highlands had changed since the first decade of the 19th Century. The names are significant because the land which is closest to Glenurquhart bay and the Inverness-Fort Augustus Road are given Anglicised titles. Three of the main natural areas of the map are river Coiltie, Shewglie Wood and Lochletter Wood. The dense forests on these demonstrate that there was little attempt to clear the great woods in the area during the transition towards sheep farming.

The map is titled Loch Meikle, because this area was of great importance, due to its being an affluent area of the Glen. The field beside the Loch is called Lakefield, which indicates the long term presence of the Anglicised land owners. Whilst the maps of 19th Century Glenurquhart gave prominence to land use and the economic properties of the area, this map gives a detailed portrayal of Glenurquhart as a village. This is symbolic of the way in which Glenurquhart was no longer a natural resource for an Anglicised aristocracy, but a part of Britain. There is also a post office which demonstrates that Britain's infrastructure had connected rural Scotland to the rest of the nation.

Other signs of English influence on rural Scotland can be deduced from titles such as 'lodge' and a 'parsonage'. The parsonage is beside the Episcopal Church of St Ninian's. This demonstrates that there Glenurquhart had become partially Anglicised because 'manse' is the Scottish word for Parsonage. 'Lodge' is also an English word, and the use of this word amidst many Gaelic place names demonstrates the large role that hunting played in Highland tourism at the time.

Another English name for a local construction is 'Aqueduct'. This is from a Latin word and demonstrates the way in which the British government still used Latin words to give gravitas to many of their building projects.

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Loch Meikle

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1900s

Strath Marsley; Corriemony House; Coire Beag; Kyleachorkty Lodge; Breckry Wood; Druim Fada; zoomable images

Glenurquhart Heritage Group

Glenurquhart Heritage Group (maps)

It can be seen by this map of Glenurquhart that cartography of the Scottish Highlands had changed since the first decade of the 19th Century. The names are significant because the land which is closest to Glenurquhart bay and the Inverness-Fort Augustus Road are given Anglicised titles. Three of the main natural areas of the map are river Coiltie, Shewglie Wood and Lochletter Wood. The dense forests on these demonstrate that there was little attempt to clear the great woods in the area during the transition towards sheep farming. <br /> <br /> The map is titled Loch Meikle, because this area was of great importance, due to its being an affluent area of the Glen. The field beside the Loch is called Lakefield, which indicates the long term presence of the Anglicised land owners. Whilst the maps of 19th Century Glenurquhart gave prominence to land use and the economic properties of the area, this map gives a detailed portrayal of Glenurquhart as a village. This is symbolic of the way in which Glenurquhart was no longer a natural resource for an Anglicised aristocracy, but a part of Britain. There is also a post office which demonstrates that Britain's infrastructure had connected rural Scotland to the rest of the nation.<br /> <br /> Other signs of English influence on rural Scotland can be deduced from titles such as 'lodge' and a 'parsonage'. The parsonage is beside the Episcopal Church of St Ninian's. This demonstrates that there Glenurquhart had become partially Anglicised because 'manse' is the Scottish word for Parsonage. 'Lodge' is also an English word, and the use of this word amidst many Gaelic place names demonstrates the large role that hunting played in Highland tourism at the time. <br /> <br /> Another English name for a local construction is 'Aqueduct'. This is from a Latin word and demonstrates the way in which the British government still used Latin words to give gravitas to many of their building projects.