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TITLE
Memories of old Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_TOTTIEBROWN_04
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
2276
KEYWORDS
coaches
horse-drawn carriages
transport
audio

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In this audio extract, a resident of Inverness recalls her childhood memories growing up in Castle Street in the first quarter of the twentieth century. The recording dates from around 1986.

'Aye Inverness has changed completely though - just a little country town when I was little, horse and cart. All horses. And next door to us was - You know Bobbo Mackay that was the provost for a while, you know, well, he was next door to us, you know? And his father was the - he used to break horses, and he used to do the four-in-hands, and he would say to us in the summer time (they had a big family though) and he would say, 'I'll take Nannie and Tottie. Dress them up,' tell my mother, 'dress them up' - my mother wasn't very keen - 'and I'll stop the horses on the brae' - that's going up Culduthel Brae. And he would take us to Culloden; if there was room at the back for us, and we hadn't to speak to any of the toffs. And he'd the bugle at the back, and all in livery and everything, and Mr. Mackay in the front with his - What do you call the man in front again? Oh, I should know all that, my memory's not so good now, and he'd be in the front wi the four horses. He was a great man wi the horses.

Was he the coachman?

Aye, they'd another name for it.

Aye, they'd another name for it.

Another name for it, aye. And then he would break up and then the ladies would all come out and the gentlemen to the cairngorm - to the cairn in Culloden and we had to sit at the side of the road, not open our mouth. And then he'd go back round Balloch - course it was only villages then, of course, if he was - and back by Eastgate and then he'd stop at Eastgate and we'd to take off again there. That was only if there was room for us. Once or twice. It was the highlight in our lives to get that. He was an awful nice gentleman, Bobbo's father. He loved his horses and he was broken hearted when they told him he'd to drive a car. He was an old man by this time and he said, 'I'll never drive a car', but he did.

Who was he employed with, Tottie?

Macrae and Dicks. Oh yes, Macrae and Dicks was the chief there - and his grandfather before him, his father and grandfather, they were all breaking, break the horses, they were all horsemen.

Mm-hmm'

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Memories of old Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1980s

coaches; horse-drawn carriages; transport; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Inverness Recollections

In this audio extract, a resident of Inverness recalls her childhood memories growing up in Castle Street in the first quarter of the twentieth century. The recording dates from around 1986. <br /> <br /> 'Aye Inverness has changed completely though - just a little country town when I was little, horse and cart. All horses. And next door to us was - You know Bobbo Mackay that was the provost for a while, you know, well, he was next door to us, you know? And his father was the - he used to break horses, and he used to do the four-in-hands, and he would say to us in the summer time (they had a big family though) and he would say, 'I'll take Nannie and Tottie. Dress them up,' tell my mother, 'dress them up' - my mother wasn't very keen - 'and I'll stop the horses on the brae' - that's going up Culduthel Brae. And he would take us to Culloden; if there was room at the back for us, and we hadn't to speak to any of the toffs. And he'd the bugle at the back, and all in livery and everything, and Mr. Mackay in the front with his - What do you call the man in front again? Oh, I should know all that, my memory's not so good now, and he'd be in the front wi the four horses. He was a great man wi the horses.<br /> <br /> Was he the coachman?<br /> <br /> Aye, they'd another name for it.<br /> <br /> Aye, they'd another name for it. <br /> <br /> Another name for it, aye. And then he would break up and then the ladies would all come out and the gentlemen to the cairngorm - to the cairn in Culloden and we had to sit at the side of the road, not open our mouth. And then he'd go back round Balloch - course it was only villages then, of course, if he was - and back by Eastgate and then he'd stop at Eastgate and we'd to take off again there. That was only if there was room for us. Once or twice. It was the highlight in our lives to get that. He was an awful nice gentleman, Bobbo's father. He loved his horses and he was broken hearted when they told him he'd to drive a car. He was an old man by this time and he said, 'I'll never drive a car', but he did. <br /> <br /> Who was he employed with, Tottie?<br /> <br /> Macrae and Dicks. Oh yes, Macrae and Dicks was the chief there - and his grandfather before him, his father and grandfather, they were all breaking, break the horses, they were all horsemen.<br /> <br /> Mm-hmm'