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TITLE
Five Views of Grantown on Spey
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GM_POSTCARDS_018
PLACENAME
Grantown on Spey
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
MORAYSHIRE: Cromdale, Inverallan and Advie
SOURCE
Grantown Museum
ASSET ID
23268
KEYWORDS
postcards
landscapes
trees
fields
villages
buildings
houses
cars
fishing
rivers
bridges
Five Views of Grantown on Spey

Located approximately 32 km southeast of Inverness, Grantown is a planned village, established in 1765 by the local landowner, Sir James Grant.

Grantown is one of approximately 150 planned villages that were established in Scotland between 1750 and 1850. Agricultural improvements that took place during the 18th century, especially the enclosure of farmland, meant that far fewer people were needed to work the land. This led to much social disruption, and many landowners in Scotland created planned villages as a way of promoting trade and industry in their area, and as a means of providing employment to those who had been forced to leave the land.

Sir James Grant laid out Grantown around a large, central square on a site that was well served by two military roads. Leases for building plots were put up for sale in 1765, and Sir James placed an advert in the 'Aberdeen Journal' stating that he would give "Feus or long leases, and all proper encouragement to Manufacturers, Tradesmen, or others, sufficiently recommended and attested, as to Character and Ability, who incline to settle there."

Sir James invested heavily to attract manufacturers of different kinds to Grantown, but by the late 1700s it was clear that these industries were failing to prosper. The settlement found success however as a service centre for the surrounding district, and from the 1860s onwards prospered also from an increase in the number of tourists visiting the area.

This growth in tourism was due in part to the arrival of the railway to Grantown in 1863, which enabled far greater numbers of tourists to visit the settlement. In September 1860 Grantown was also visited by Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, whose purchase of Balmoral in the 1840s had significantly boosted the appeal of the Highlands to the British public.

The historian RN MacMillan has described Grantown as "among the best-preserved and most interesting of all Scottish planned villages". Today, it is still a centre of tourism, and has a population of just over 2,000.

This postcard shows images of both the Old and New Spey Bridges. The New Bridge, seen on the top left of the postcard, was opened in 1931 and is approximately 1 km south of Grantown on Spey. The Old Bridge, seen in the bottom left and bottom right of the postcard is 1.5 km southeast of Grantown and was built in 1754 by General Wade's successor, Major William Caulfield, as part of the military road that ran from Coupar Angus to Fort George.


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Grantown Museum

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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Five Views of Grantown on Spey

MORAYSHIRE: Cromdale, Inverallan and Advie

postcards;landscapes; trees; fields; villages; buildings; houses; cars; fishing; rivers; bridges;

Grantown Museum

Grantown Museum Photographic Collection

Located approximately 32 km southeast of Inverness, Grantown is a planned village, established in 1765 by the local landowner, Sir James Grant.<br /> <br /> Grantown is one of approximately 150 planned villages that were established in Scotland between 1750 and 1850. Agricultural improvements that took place during the 18th century, especially the enclosure of farmland, meant that far fewer people were needed to work the land. This led to much social disruption, and many landowners in Scotland created planned villages as a way of promoting trade and industry in their area, and as a means of providing employment to those who had been forced to leave the land.<br /> <br /> Sir James Grant laid out Grantown around a large, central square on a site that was well served by two military roads. Leases for building plots were put up for sale in 1765, and Sir James placed an advert in the 'Aberdeen Journal' stating that he would give "Feus or long leases, and all proper encouragement to Manufacturers, Tradesmen, or others, sufficiently recommended and attested, as to Character and Ability, who incline to settle there."<br /> <br /> Sir James invested heavily to attract manufacturers of different kinds to Grantown, but by the late 1700s it was clear that these industries were failing to prosper. The settlement found success however as a service centre for the surrounding district, and from the 1860s onwards prospered also from an increase in the number of tourists visiting the area. <br /> <br /> This growth in tourism was due in part to the arrival of the railway to Grantown in 1863, which enabled far greater numbers of tourists to visit the settlement. In September 1860 Grantown was also visited by Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, whose purchase of Balmoral in the 1840s had significantly boosted the appeal of the Highlands to the British public.<br /> <br /> The historian RN MacMillan has described Grantown as "among the best-preserved and most interesting of all Scottish planned villages". Today, it is still a centre of tourism, and has a population of just over 2,000.<br /> <br /> This postcard shows images of both the Old and New Spey Bridges. The New Bridge, seen on the top left of the postcard, was opened in 1931 and is approximately 1 km south of Grantown on Spey. The Old Bridge, seen in the bottom left and bottom right of the postcard is 1.5 km southeast of Grantown and was built in 1754 by General Wade's successor, Major William Caulfield, as part of the military road that ran from Coupar Angus to Fort George. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href="mailto: gosmuseum@btconnect.com">Grantown Museum</a>