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TITLE
The Old Man of the Grain of Seed
EXTERNAL ID
HC_GAELICSTORYTAPE_002
DATE OF RECORDING
1997
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
The Highland Council
ASSET ID
2331
KEYWORDS
oral tradition
folklore
stories
Gaelic
story telling
audio

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This story is recorded in Gaelic and the following is an English translation.

The Old Man of the Grain of Seed.

Long ago there was an old man and one day he found a little seed and he took it to a little house where an old lady lived.

"Will you keep this little seed for me?" said the old man, "and I shall come back tomorrow and take it away."

"Yes, indeed I shall," said the old woman, "indeed and I shall!"

Off went the old man and he went home to his own house. Next day, early in the morning, he came back.

"Where is the little seed I left here yesterday?" asked the old man.

"I am most terribly sorry," replied the old woman, "didn't my little hen come in and eat it!"

"Well then," said the old man, "if that is the way it is, I'll have the hen itself."

Up he lifted the hen and put it in the bag and over he went to another old woman's house.

"Will you keep this little hen for me?" said the old man, "and I shall come back tomorrow and take it away."

"Yes, indeed, I shall," said the old woman, "indeed and I shall."

Off went the old man and he went home to his own house. Next day, early in the morning, he came back.

"Where is the little hen that I left here yesterday?" asked the old man.

"I am most terribly sorry," replied the old woman, "didn't my little cow come in and stand on it and kill it!"

"Well then," said the old man, "if that is how it is, let me have the cow itself."

He took the cow away and over he went to another old woman's house.

"Will you keep this little cow for me?" said the old man, "and I'll come back tomorrow and take it away."

"I shall indeed," said the old woman, "indeed and I shall."

Off went the old man and he went home to his own house. Next day, early in the morning, he came back.

"Where is the little cow that I left here yesterday?" asked the old man.

"I am most terribly sorry," replied the old woman, "did my daughter not go down to the stream with her, to give her a drink of water, and did the cow not fall and break her bones!"

"O, well then," said the old man, "if that is the way it is, let me have the girl herself." He threw off his bag.

"Get in there, girl," said the old man.

"I will not indeed," said the girl, "indeed and I will not!"

The old man caught her and stuck her in the bag, and over he went to another old woman's house.

"Will you keep this bag for me?" asked the old man, "and I'll come back tomorrow and take it away."

"I shall indeed," replied the old woman, "indeed and I shall!"

Off went the old man and he went home to his own house. But when the old man went away, did the old woman not hear a little soft cry inside the bag!

"Let me out, let me out; whatever you do, will you not let me out!"

The old woman opened the bag and let the girl out. The old woman and the girl then filled the bag with cats and rats and mice and badgers.

The old man came back next day, very early in the morning.

"Where is the bag I left here yesterday?" asked the old man.

"There it is, over there, behind the door," replied the old woman. "Take it, take it away from here!"

Off went the old man with the bag.

"Sing a song, girl, as the journey is so long," said the old man.

No song came from the bag but the mewing of the cats and the squeaking of the rats and badgers.

"Are you making fun of me, my girl?" said the old man, in a fury.

He threw off the bag and opened it. Out jumped the cats and the rats and the mice and the badgers, and they were pretty angry as well!

They scratched and scraped the poor old man, and off he took as fast as he ever went in his life. He didn't stop until he was inside his own house and never again, for evermore, did he take away anything that did not belong to him.

So there you have the old man of the little seed.

This story is from a collection of stories available on tape, with an accompanying book, under the title 'Am Bloigh Beag le Beannachd'

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The Old Man of the Grain of Seed

1990s

oral tradition; folklore; stories; Gaelic; story telling; audio

The Highland Council

Am Bloigh Beag le Beannachd (Cassette)

This story is recorded in Gaelic and the following is an English translation.<br /> <br /> The Old Man of the Grain of Seed.<br /> <br /> Long ago there was an old man and one day he found a little seed and he took it to a little house where an old lady lived.<br /> <br /> "Will you keep this little seed for me?" said the old man, "and I shall come back tomorrow and take it away."<br /> <br /> "Yes, indeed I shall," said the old woman, "indeed and I shall!"<br /> <br /> Off went the old man and he went home to his own house. Next day, early in the morning, he came back.<br /> <br /> "Where is the little seed I left here yesterday?" asked the old man.<br /> <br /> "I am most terribly sorry," replied the old woman, "didn't my little hen come in and eat it!"<br /> <br /> "Well then," said the old man, "if that is the way it is, I'll have the hen itself."<br /> <br /> Up he lifted the hen and put it in the bag and over he went to another old woman's house.<br /> <br /> "Will you keep this little hen for me?" said the old man, "and I shall come back tomorrow and take it away."<br /> <br /> "Yes, indeed, I shall," said the old woman, "indeed and I shall."<br /> <br /> Off went the old man and he went home to his own house. Next day, early in the morning, he came back.<br /> <br /> "Where is the little hen that I left here yesterday?" asked the old man.<br /> <br /> "I am most terribly sorry," replied the old woman, "didn't my little cow come in and stand on it and kill it!"<br /> <br /> "Well then," said the old man, "if that is how it is, let me have the cow itself."<br /> <br /> He took the cow away and over he went to another old woman's house.<br /> <br /> "Will you keep this little cow for me?" said the old man, "and I'll come back tomorrow and take it away."<br /> <br /> "I shall indeed," said the old woman, "indeed and I shall."<br /> <br /> Off went the old man and he went home to his own house. Next day, early in the morning, he came back.<br /> <br /> "Where is the little cow that I left here yesterday?" asked the old man.<br /> <br /> "I am most terribly sorry," replied the old woman, "did my daughter not go down to the stream with her, to give her a drink of water, and did the cow not fall and break her bones!"<br /> <br /> "O, well then," said the old man, "if that is the way it is, let me have the girl herself." He threw off his bag.<br /> <br /> "Get in there, girl," said the old man.<br /> <br /> "I will not indeed," said the girl, "indeed and I will not!"<br /> <br /> The old man caught her and stuck her in the bag, and over he went to another old woman's house.<br /> <br /> "Will you keep this bag for me?" asked the old man, "and I'll come back tomorrow and take it away."<br /> <br /> "I shall indeed," replied the old woman, "indeed and I shall!"<br /> <br /> Off went the old man and he went home to his own house. But when the old man went away, did the old woman not hear a little soft cry inside the bag!<br /> <br /> "Let me out, let me out; whatever you do, will you not let me out!"<br /> <br /> The old woman opened the bag and let the girl out. The old woman and the girl then filled the bag with cats and rats and mice and badgers.<br /> <br /> The old man came back next day, very early in the morning.<br /> <br /> "Where is the bag I left here yesterday?" asked the old man.<br /> <br /> "There it is, over there, behind the door," replied the old woman. "Take it, take it away from here!"<br /> <br /> Off went the old man with the bag.<br /> <br /> "Sing a song, girl, as the journey is so long," said the old man.<br /> <br /> No song came from the bag but the mewing of the cats and the squeaking of the rats and badgers.<br /> <br /> "Are you making fun of me, my girl?" said the old man, in a fury.<br /> <br /> He threw off the bag and opened it. Out jumped the cats and the rats and the mice and the badgers, and they were pretty angry as well!<br /> <br /> They scratched and scraped the poor old man, and off he took as fast as he ever went in his life. He didn't stop until he was inside his own house and never again, for evermore, did he take away anything that did not belong to him.<br /> <br /> So there you have the old man of the little seed.<br /> <br /> This story is from a collection of stories available on tape, with an accompanying book, under the title 'Am Bloigh Beag le Beannachd'