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TITLE
The Fountain and Memorial Hall, Tomintoul
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GM_POSTCARDS_098
PLACENAME
Tomintoul
DISTRICT
Dufftown
SOURCE
Grantown Museum
ASSET ID
23345
KEYWORDS
building
buildings
architecture
The Fountain and Memorial Hall, Tomintoul

Located approximately 22 km southwest of Grantown on Spey, Tomintoul is a planned village, established in the 1770s by the local landowner, Alexander, fourth Duke of Gordon.

Tomintoul is one of approximately 150 planned villages that were established in Scotland between 1750 and 1850. Agricultural improvements that took place during the 18th century, especially the enclosure of farmland, meant that far fewer people were needed to work the land. This led to much social disruption, and many landowners in Scotland created planned villages as a way of promoting trade and industry in their area, and as a means of providing employment to those who had been forced to leave the land.

Tomintoul was laid out around a central square on a site that took advantage of the military road that passed over the Lecht from Braemar. Initial surveys of the area were undertaken in 1775 and the first tenants moved into Tomintoul in 1780.

The Duke of Gordon planned to build up a flax and linen industry in the village, but it failed to prosper. The economy of the area was however bolstered after 1824, when the distilling of whisky on a large scale was legalised. A number of distilleries opened in the vicinity of Tomintoul, including one at Glenlivet, and whisky production still plays a central part in the local economy.

Queen Victoria passed through Tomintoul in September 1860, while on a trip from Balmoral. She was unimpressed with the village and wrote in her diary that, "Tomintoul is the most tumble-down, poor-looking place I ever saw - a long street with three inns, miserable dirty-looking houses and people, and a sad look of wretchedness about it."

The cast-iron drinking fountain, located in Tomintoul's main square and seen in this image, was gifted to the people of the village in 1915 by Robert Gordon. There are two small cast-iron steps at the base of the fountain for use by children, inscribed with the words, 'Step Up Bairns'.


This image may be available to purchase.
For further information about purchasing and prices please email
Grantown Museum

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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The Fountain and Memorial Hall, Tomintoul

building; buildings; architecture

Grantown Museum

Grantown Museum Photographic Collection

Located approximately 22 km southwest of Grantown on Spey, Tomintoul is a planned village, established in the 1770s by the local landowner, Alexander, fourth Duke of Gordon.<br /> <br /> Tomintoul is one of approximately 150 planned villages that were established in Scotland between 1750 and 1850. Agricultural improvements that took place during the 18th century, especially the enclosure of farmland, meant that far fewer people were needed to work the land. This led to much social disruption, and many landowners in Scotland created planned villages as a way of promoting trade and industry in their area, and as a means of providing employment to those who had been forced to leave the land. <br /> <br /> Tomintoul was laid out around a central square on a site that took advantage of the military road that passed over the Lecht from Braemar. Initial surveys of the area were undertaken in 1775 and the first tenants moved into Tomintoul in 1780. <br /> <br /> The Duke of Gordon planned to build up a flax and linen industry in the village, but it failed to prosper. The economy of the area was however bolstered after 1824, when the distilling of whisky on a large scale was legalised. A number of distilleries opened in the vicinity of Tomintoul, including one at Glenlivet, and whisky production still plays a central part in the local economy. <br /> <br /> Queen Victoria passed through Tomintoul in September 1860, while on a trip from Balmoral. She was unimpressed with the village and wrote in her diary that, "Tomintoul is the most tumble-down, poor-looking place I ever saw - a long street with three inns, miserable dirty-looking houses and people, and a sad look of wretchedness about it."<br /> <br /> The cast-iron drinking fountain, located in Tomintoul's main square and seen in this image, was gifted to the people of the village in 1915 by Robert Gordon. There are two small cast-iron steps at the base of the fountain for use by children, inscribed with the words, 'Step Up Bairns'. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href="mailto: gosmuseum@btconnect.com">Grantown Museum</a>